Australia

Key sites of radical struggle in Sydney’s history were included in a “Radical Sydney Walking Tour” conducted by historians Rowan Cahill and Terry Irving, and sponsored by Green Left Weekly, on April 13.

“It’s almost an annual event — year in year out — that people in Broadmeadows have to cop a factory fire [and] have to cop toxic shit dumped on them”, local resident Marcus Harrington told a rally of angry northern suburbs residents after another chemical blaze erupted on April 5.

More than 100 LGBTI activists and supporters attended a rally on April 13 targeting the Royal on the Park Hotel which is owned by the Sultan of Brunei who recently introduced the death penalty for homosexuality, adultery, blasphemy and apostasy.

Australia’s capitalists were quick to see the tremendous marketing potential of Anzac Day by aligning their consumer brand with the officially revered military brand of Anzac. As early as 1916, the “commercial appeal” of the word “Anzac” was being used to flog various foodstuffs, beverages, soaps, toys, all sorts of apparel, Rexona healing ointment (tested in the trenches!), watches, matches, jewellery, cafés and restaurants.

Fascistic President of Brazil Jair Bolsonaro visited the state of Israel over March and April this year, where he was warmly welcomed.

The Combined Refugee Action Group (CRAG) launched its campaign to highlight the cruel treatment of refugees in the country’s most marginal electorate, Corangamite, on April 7.

Members of the Sudanese-Australian community protested outside a meeting between representatives of the regime of Sudanese President Omar Bashir and Australian business groups, in Belmore on April 10.

Thousands of unionists rallied around Australia on April 10 in the latest round of Change the Rules protests.

Brazilian solidarity activists rallied in Sydney on April 7.

Speakers called for the release of jailed former Brazilian president Lula Da Silva and spoke out against the far-right government of Jair Bolsonaro and its attacks on democracy.

 

One hundred years after the Red flag Riots, Jim McIlroy looks at the polarisation after World War I, in which far-right aggression was incited by governments and “respectable” political forces.

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