'One rule for the rich,' says Corbyn after Paradise Papers exposes powerful and wealthy

November 7, 2017

Britain's socialist Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the Paradise Papers, 13 million files leaked files that expose how the rich and powerful systematically evade tax, shows “one rule for the super-rich and another for the rest". 

US Senator Bernie Sanders, for his part, said the documents show "how these billionaires and multinational corporations get richer by hiding their wealth and profits and avoid paying their fair share of taxes".

Common Dreams reported: "From multiple members of Trump's cabinet to the British Royal Family, [the] document dump of offshore dealings shows how political leaders —joined by wealthy celebrities and the ultra-rich — shelter their assets, keep shady relationships secret, and game the tax systems of nations around the globe ...

"First obtained by the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung, the documents were then shared with scores of journalists and researchers associated with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and other media organizations, including the New York TimesBBC, and the Guardian."

"There is this small group of people who are not equally subject to the laws as the rest of us, and that's on purpose," said author and financial expert Brooke Harrington in response to the new insights about how these elites secretly manage their wealth.

The ICIJ reported the "trove of 13.4 million records exposes ties between Russia and U.S. President Donald Trump's billionaire commerce secretary, the secret dealings of the chief fundraiser for Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the offshore interests of the Queen of England and more than 120 politicians around the world." According to the ICIJ, the documents 

show how deeply the offshore financial system is entangled with the overlapping worlds of political players, private wealth and corporate giants, including Apple, Nike, Uber and other global companies that avoid taxes through increasingly imaginative bookkeeping maneuvers.

At the center of the leak, explains the Guardian, is the law firm Appleby which has "outposts in Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands, the Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey. In contrast to Mossack Fonseca, the discredited firm at the centre of last year's Panama Papers investigation, Appleby prides itself on being a leading member of the 'magic circle' of top-ranking offshore service providers."

According to a summary by the Guardian, the 'Paradise Papers' reveal:

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