anti-nuclear

Communities say no to nuclear waste dump

After two decades of failing to secure a nuclear waste dump site in South Australia and the Northern Territory through a top down approach, early last year the federal government initiated a voluntary nomination process calling on landholders to put forward their land for assessment.

A shortlist of six was released after 28 sites were nominated around Australia: Hill End in NSW; Omanama in Queensland; Hale in the Northern Territory; Cortlinye and Pinkawillinie in the Kimba region of South Australia; and Barndioota station in the Flinders Ranges, South Australia.

Anthropocene Working Group: Yes, a new epoch has begun


“Potentially the most widespread and globally synchronous anthropogenic signal is the fallout from nuclear weapons testing.”

Repeatedly, over hundreds of thousands of years, glaciers expanded south and north from the polar regions, covering much of the Earth with ice sheets several kilometres deep.

Don't nuclear waste Australia, say activists

Up to 100 people gathered in Wollongong on December 5 to witness the New South Wales government's costly operation to move 25 tonnes of highly radioactive nuclear waste through Port Kembla to the Lucas Heights facility in southern Sydney.

After a welcome to country by a prominent traditional land owner and elder, we were addressed by representatives from the Maritime Union of Australia, the South Coast Labour Council and Beyond Nuclear initiative.

Overnight and into the early morning, Greenpeace activists on flotillas witnessed the incoming shipment on their flotillas.

Where to after the successful climate marches?

More than 2000 People's Climate Marches were held over the weekend of November 27 to 29. In Australia more than 140,000 people took to the streets to show they care, passionately, about climate change. They are also angry at government inaction, as illustrated by the many homemade placards and props.

These marches were the biggest national anti-government mobilisations for many years. The Melbourne march — a huge 60,000 people — was the biggest street march there since the anti-Work Choices protests of 2005.

The Greens' renewables plan: a mixed bag

On November 22, the Australian Greens launched their updated renewable energy plan Renew Australia.

The plan improves on their 2013 Clean Energy Roadmap, which was light on detail, merely calling for the Renewable Energy Target (RET) to be raised to 90% by 2030, more funding for the commercialisation of renewable energy technology and improved coordination and planning of the electricity grid.

Punx Against Plutonium

Worldsend Hotel, Hindley St Adelaide
Adelaide and Melbourne punx come together to play a really diverse set to raise money for The Lizard Bites Back - convergence at the Olympic Dam Gates of Hell July 1-3rd 2016.
December 18th at 7:30pm $12, $10

Event date: 
Fri, 18/12/2015 - 8:00pm
Event time: 
Fri, 18/12/2015 - 8:00pm

World protests demand real climate action

Even with protests banned in Paris ahead of the United Nation's COP21 climate talks, about 2300 climate protests sent a global message to leaders at the talks.

Hundreds of thousands of people joined climate change protests, marches and other events around the world on November 29 to send a message to leaders on the eve of COP21 that the world is waiting for climate change action. The 2300 climate actions included 175 countries.

People's Climate March: why are there no demands?

Ahead of the climate talks in Paris in December, it is important that people mobilise and demand strong action on climate change.

Without a clear message from ordinary people, the demands that business and polluting industries make of governments are more likely to dilute the outcomes.

Remember Rio? Kyoto? Copenhagen? At the Conference of Parties (COP) 21 conference in Paris, our leaders need to do more, and fast.

Wasting Australia's future

The appointment of nuclear power advocate Alan Finkel as Australia's next Chief Scientist led to speculation that the federal government might be softening up Australians for the introduction of nuclear power.

But that speculation is likely misplaced. Finkel is not the first Chief Scientist to support nuclear power. It goes with the turf: boys like toys and Chief Scientists like nuclear power. Finkel's comments were actually quite nuanced and at least as supportive of renewables as nuclear power.

Restoring a safe climate: Impossible dream or dangerous distraction?

Should the climate movement call for the restoration of a safe climate, rather than just zero emissions?

According to a recent paper, Striking Targets, by climate writer Philip Sutton, greenhouse gas concentrations are already too high to avoid dangerous global warming, so the zero emissions goal is inadequate.

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