First Nations voice to parliament

For many young people, the fact that modern Australia emerged from a colonial-settler society founded on the violent dispossession of First Nations peoples is a self-evident fact. Sarah Hathway and Sam Wainwright comment on a significant political shift underway.

Tens of thousands of people joined Invasion Day protests around the country on January 26. 

Labor's Indigenous Voice to Parliament will be another token gesture, unless the government is forced by a strong popular movement to take real measures towards First Nations justice, argues Socialist Alliance.

Socialist Alliance delegates discussed global and domestic political developments and decided on directions and campaign priorities at its 17th national conference. Chloe DS reports.

Campaigners for the 1967 referendum on Aboriginal rights

Frances Peters-Little, director of Vote Yes For Aboriginies, a film about the 1967 referendum, discusses the political context of the vote and the upcoming referendum on the Voice to Parliament with Isaac Nellist.

History shows that governments have consistently resisted any proposals from First Nations advisory bodies to deliver real justice. Peter Boyle argues that the Voice to Parliament could end up as another token gesture, unless there is a strong and independent movement for First Nations justice.

“In our negotiations with Labor, I’ve asked for their evidence that the Voice will not cede our sovereignty. To date, no one has responded to this request,” Senator Lidia Thorpe told Paul Gregoire.

The proposed Voice to Parliament would mean little “meaningful change” for First Nations people, according to the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre president Graeme Gardner. Isaac Nellist reports.

The Labor government has reignited hope that First Nations peoples will be included in decision-making. But the lasting impact of colonisation in how laws are applied also has to be addressed, argues Isaac Nellist.

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