Issue 1315

News

Alex Bainbridge reports on a protest to mark eight years since Kevin Rudd declared the so-called “PNG solution”.

Protesters marked eight years since the Kevin Rudd government announced he would stop asylum seekers arriving by boat from ever settling in Australia. Alex Salmon reports.

The Australia-Cuba Friendship Society organised a solidarity event to protest the crippling United States blockade on Cuba, reports Alex Brainbridge.

Defenders of the historic Willow Grove are disappointed with the NSW Supreme Court’s decision to give the go-ahead to its destruction. But Susan Price reports they are determined to fight on.

The Transport Workers Union is pushing for strike action after talks broke down with Toll, which wants to impose a new workplace agreement that slashes conditions. Jim McIlroy reports.

The cases of 18 refugee rights activists who participated in a car convoy last year have been adjourned to October. Chris Slee reports.

Refugee rights supporters rallied outside Northern Hospital to show their support for a Tamil refugee who has been detained for more than 11 years. Chris Slee reports.

Lurking off the coast of China’s eastern seaboard are three US aircraft carrier battle groups, to be joined by a British aircraft carrier group and Australian and Canadian warships. Talisman Sabre 2021 has just begun, reports Kerry Smith.

Veteran socialist councillor Sue Bolton has been pre-selected to run for the Socialist Alliance in the federal seat of Wills, reports Jacob Andrewartha.

Support for casual retail workers at a popular bookshop in the Inner West, who are campaigning for a workplace agreement, is growing. Isaac Nellist reports.

The father of a young First Nations man who was involved in a Parklea Correctional Centre roof-top protest against racism has spoken out about conditions in the prison system. Isaac Nellist reports.

Workers at Annette Kellerman Aquatic Centre in Marrickville who have been stood down without pay during the lockdown are organising for their rights. Isaac Nellist reports.

Hundreds showed solidarity with workers taking protected industrial action to support their colleagues who were replaced with labour hire by Svitzer. Jacob Andrewartha reports.

Analysis

Niko Leka quotes from Farhad Bandesh, who was imprisoned on Manus Island and later in the Mantra Hotel, who said the torture of innocent people amounts to the 'absolute neglect of humanity'.

The federal government has failed on vaccines, quarantine and adequate or timely income support. Alex Bainbridge and Sarah Hathway argue that for a lockdown to work, it is imperative workers have income support and stable housing.

While the changes to superannuation have been welcomed by many, workers in the gig economy and women remain at risk of being left behind. Suzanne James reports.

The United Nations has designated Australia as having done the least out of 193 countries to combat climate change. Patrick McDonald reports.

Federal environment minister Sussan Ley is challenging a ruling that the government has a duty of care to children when considering the approval of fossil fuel projects, writes Paul Gregoire.

A second pandemic is lurking in the shadows of COVID-19 — the pandemic of femicide and violence against women, writes Markela Panegyres.

Green Left spoke with Sister Susan Connelly, convenor of the Timor Sea Justice Forum and a co-convenor of the Alliance Against Political Prosecutions, about the latest developments in the Witness K and Bernard Collaery case.

The aggressive police operation to “combat” the COVID-19 outbreak in Sydney’s South West is yet another example of politicians’ racist, anti-working class and punitive handling of the pandemic, argues Markela Panegyres.

From Labor Prime Minister Julia Gillard to Coalition PM Scott Morrison, Australian leaders have tried to appear in a chorus of extras, parroting that Assange had broken the law, writes Stuart Rees.

Activists continue to organise against the cashless debit card, which is being rolled out in lower socio-economic communities. Bernadette Smith reports.

The NSW government, not local government, must be forced to remediate a community park near the largest traffic interchange in the southern hemisphere, argues Pip Hinman.

World

Mira Ibrahim, Shelan Khodedah and Zeynep Korkmaz share their personal stories illustrating the struggle for liberation of the Kurdish and Yezidi people.

As the investigation into President Jovenel Moïse’s assassination unfolds, the United States is laying the groundwork to deploy troops into Haiti, writes Dan Cohen.

The US government says it is going to help Central America fight corruption and free the Cuban people. But any help from the US comes with ulterior motives, writes Tamara Pearson.

After nearly two decades of war and occupation, United States and NATO forces have withdrawn from Afghanistan, leaving Afghans to pick up the pieces, reports Pip Hinman.

Following betrayal and expulsion, Forward Andalusia has regrouped and relaunched, reports Dick Nichols.

For six decades now, the United States has unsuccessfully sought to achieve regime change in Cuba, writes Ian Ellis-Jones.

The impacts of climate change in the Pacific are compounded by the legacy of colonial occupation and the responses of rich countries to displacement, writes Susan Price.

Save the NHS

Boris Johnson's government is intent on delivering the National Health Service to global private health providers and private health insurance conglomerates — unless it is stopped, writes Bob Gill.

Protests have erupted in Eswatini, a southern African kingdom formerly known as Swaziland, following the alleged police murder of a law student in early May, reports Maxime Bowen.

The campaign to overturn Peru’s presidential election results is one of “unconventional warfare”, report José Carlos Llerena Robles and Vijay Prashad.

Culture

Jim McIlroy reviews Behind the Cold War on China, an important contribution to the current debate about China today.

Climate and Capitalism editor Ian Angus presents A People’s Green New Deal, plus three new books on pandemics and two on the global food crisis.

In his new book, Yanis Varoufakis has used fiction to stimulate our imaginations into anticipating the necessary end of capitalism, writes Dave Bell.

Gunpowder Milkshake mixes intricate fight scenes with a slick, retro, neon-inflected look, writes Barry Healy.