Issue 1297

News

Rachel Evans reports on a gathering for Waka Waka man and father of three Patrick Fisher, who was chased to his death by NSW Police three years ago.

NSW planning minister Rob Stokes has got a fight on his hands from those who don't agree the historic Willow Grove villa needs to make way for a new museum, writes Susan Price.

The Socialist Alliance is the only voice in the WA election to challenge the terrifying logic of the capitalist system to maximise profits at the expense of people's lives and the environment, reports Kerry Smith.

Sue Bolton

Socialist Alliance Moreland City Councillor Sue Bolton initiated a solidarity motion in support of Kurdish mayors who have been undemocratically removed from office by the Erdoğan regime in Turkey, reports Peter Boyle.

Gail Hickey, the mother of TJ Hickey, led a march through the streets of Redfern to mark 17 years since her son’s death on February 14, reports Isaac Nellist.

Despite the rain, a BBQ brought together residents of Explorer Street in Eveleigh, near Redfern, and others campaigning for public housing on February 13. Pip Hinman reports.

Fifty people marched to protest government policies that make it legal for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to be stolen from their families, writes Rachel Evans.

Green Left 30th anniversary event March 27 2021

Green Left is turning 30! Have a read of the many messages of support we have received from around the world.

Analysis

The WA government wants to close the Fremantle container terminal and build a new one at Kwinana. The decision is fundamentally flawed on economic and environmental grounds, writes Sam Wainwright.

We need a clear-eyed understanding of the implications of current Chinese policies concerning Australia, argues Dave Bell.

There was a sense of relief that former Collingwood president Eddie McGuire was forced to quit, but why is it that racists, or apologists for racism, often escape the consequences, asks Jacob Andrewartha.

Facebook ban

Green Left is one of the many independent outlets that have become collateral damage in the power struggle between old and new media oligarchs, argue Pip Hinman and Susan Price.

Alan Broughton and Elena Garcia argue that the Nationals' campaign to exclude agriculture from the 2030 emissions' cuts is not supported by farmers.

Sarah Hathway reports on Australia’s largest ever study of young LGBTI people which finds that while progress has been made, more needs to be done.

Green Left speaks with cultural theorist Aleks Wansbrough about the struggle for ecosocialism in the time of Elon Musk

World

Right from the start, agreements and plans for the development of COVID-19 vaccines were going to privilege a profit-generating and market-based approach, writes Dale McKinley.

In the first round of Ecuador’s presidential elections held on February 7, Alliance for Hope's candidate Andrés Arauz won the largest number of votes but fell just short winning the elections outright, write Vijay Prashad and Pilar Troya

Following Catalonia's February 14 election, writes Dick Nichols, pro-independence parties will need to find an agreed path to force the Spanish government to meet the demands of Catalans for amnesty and an independence referendum.

Yoweri Museveni, Uganda’s 76-year-old leader who has been in power since 1986, won another five-year term in the January 14 presidential election, writes Yanis Iqbal.

For now, the Republican Party remains Trump’s party. A mass response is the only way to stop neo-fascist, ultra-nationalist forces, argue Malik Miah and Barry Sheppard.

The Turkish state has escalated its war on the Kurds, attacking Garê in Iraqi Kurdistan with airstrikes, writes Sarah Glynn

Culture

Australian sci-fi climate change movie 2067

Barry Healy reviews 2067, a thriller set in an unnamed Australian city, racked by climate change and where oxygen must be bought from a huge corporation.

In Less is More, Jason Hickel has written a readable book that seeks to promote hope rather than doom in the era of the Anthropocene or, more appropriately, the Capitolocene, writes Hans Baer.

Barry Healy reviews One Night in Miami, which tells a story of boxing champion Muhammad Ali's 1964 meeting with Malcolm X, soul singer Sam Cooke and footballer Jim Brown.