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By Bryan Thomas COLOGNE — Boring! Ordinary! Productive! These were three of the words most used to describe the second leg of the first all-German Green Party's "Neumünster" congress, held here June 8-9. There were no histrionics, no more

By Garry Walters and Peter Boyle MELBOURNE — Premier Joan Kirner's plan to axe 10,000 permanent and 2500 temporary public service jobs — confirmed in her June 19 "share the pain" economic statement — may provoke industrial action. Kirner

By Rod Webb Opera in Italy involves more than music. ROD WEBB reports from Milan. It's 8.15 on the morning of the second 1991 performance of La Scala's favourite opera, Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata. I have scored sixth place in the queue — la

By Angela Matheson Happy Days By Samuel Beckett Director Simon Phillips Designer Mary Moore With Ruth Cracknell and Allan Penney Sydney Theatre Company Wharf Theatre Reviewed by Angela Matheson Buried to the waist in sand, Ruth

Interview by Debra Wirth The decision by the Hawke government on June 17 not to allow mining at Coronation Hill in Kakadu National Park is a victory for the traditional owners, the Jawoyn, and for the conservation of the region. DEBRA WIRTH spoke

By Renfrey Clarke What is it called when the leading opposition candidate in an election is excluded from the ballot, despite the express wishes of the legislature? In the Soviet Union today, you might well find it called "democracy" — to

By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — Boris Yeltsin will have almost unlimited powers under new government structures recently approved by the Congress of People's Deputies of the Russian Federation. As president, Yeltsin is both head of state and head

By Steve Painter Senator Jo Vallentine has suggested cancellation of the proposed August 3-4 national meeting to discuss formation of a green party. The suggestion is contained in a June 17 letter to green groups and individuals. Green Left

By Norm Dixon The claim that Iraq was developing a nuclear weapons capability and ballistic missile technology was one of the major justifications for the US-led war in the Gulf. Yet it has been revealed that the US government turned a blind eye

By Peter Annear The unexpected collapse of Communist regimes across Eastern Europe in 1989 is a continuing subject of analysis and debate among politicians of all hues. From Prague, PETER ANNEAR reports in the first of a series. In the early

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