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The campaign against the Ramsay Centre’s proposed Western Civilisation degree continues.

On May 8, Bridgid O’Brien was elected a councillor of the City of Yarra following the resignation of another councillor. She will join Stephen Jolly as a second socialist on the council.

The furious commentary accusing the federal Labor Party of losing the election because it was “too left” and “tone deaf” to the importance of coal is disputed by those who are closer to the ground, writes Pip Hinman.

Traditional owners are fighting to save ancient trees on Djab Wurrung country from being bulldozed for an extension of the Western Highway in Victoria.

Here are the best new albums that related to this month's politics. (Plus, there's a bonus if you read to the end). What albums would you suggest? Comment on TwitterFacebook, or email

The City of Newcastle Council passed a resolution “Recognising there is Global Climate Emergency and the urgent need for real action on climate change” on May 28.

Socialist Alliance supports the student-led climate movement and Extinction Rebellion and all those who want to work together to boost the numbers for the next global strike called for September, writes Jacob Andrewartha.

Three hundred people rallied on May 24 to show solidarity with refugees, who face increasing attacks following the re-election of the Coalition government.

A Queensland magistrate has declared that climate change is not an extraordinary emergency, in finding an anti-Adani protester guilty of three charges related to his blockading of coal trains.

Mainstream talk of Queenslanders embracing the Coalition at the federal elections is louder than ever but the facts are otherwise, writes Jonathan Strauss.

While the Queensland government moves to fast-track approvals for the delayed Adani coal mine in the Galilee Basin, thermal coal export forecasts continue to show a terminal decline globally in the long term, consistent with the goals of the Paris Agreement.

One of the actions requested by the local Indigenous community in the City of Fremantle’s new Reconciliation Action Plan is the greater use of Noongar place names for new streets and parks and also for significant landmarks such as Derbarl Yerrigan (Swan River), Wadjemup (Rottnest Island) and Walyalup (the greater Fremantle region).