History

Juneteenth (June 19) has finally become a national holiday in the United States. Malik Miah looks at its origins and what it represents in the struggle for Black liberation.

Radicals book cover

Jim McIlroy reviews a new anthology of lively interviews with prominent figures in the Australian radical youth scene of the 1960s.

More than 150 workers, students and residents picketed entrances to Parramatta’s historic Willow Grove on June 22, reports Susan Price.

The police killing of Black man George Floyd last May revealed how deep racism remains in the United States, writes Malik Miah

Alex Salmon reviews Working Class History, a great tool for understanding how every gain workers and ordinary people have made has come through struggle.

Palestinian flags flying in Sydney

The Kurds and the Palestinians are fighting the same struggle against oppression, writes Sarah Glynn, but it is worrying to see debates among Kurds about support for the Palestinians, and antagonism from some Palestinians towards the Kurds.

Paul Gregoire reviews a new the ground breaking four-part documentary series that puts genocide at the core of the western expansionist project.

June marks eighty years since the invasion of the Soviet Union by Nazi Germany. It was a titanic struggle that decided the outcome of World War Two. One of the fronts of struggle was cultural, as Alex Miller explains.

Alex Miller reviews a highly speculative and naive work on the death of Albert Camus, who was perhaps France’s most prominent philosophical writer of the 20th century.

For five nights in May, three locations around Warrane (Sydney Cove) will be transformed with images, music and stories of the lives and resistance of Sydney’s Black, queer and grassroots communities, writes Rachel Evans.

Barry Healy reviews Mientras dure la guerra, a film illustrating human failure and the psychology of fascism during the Spanish Civil War.

The third Green Left-hosted feminist and LGBTIQ tour was a hit, reports Kerry Smith.

John Tully looks at the history of repressive, and at times genocidal, anti-Kurdish policies that go back to the foundation of the Turkish Republic.

Sue Bull was on a bus from Canberra to Sydney’s Darling Harbour, 23 years ago, to take part in one of the most significant industrial disputes in recent history — the attack on the Maritime Union of Australia. Here, she reflects on the power of solidarity.

Renown British filmmaker and social activist Ken Loach is the target of a vicious smear campaign by pro-Zionist forces, writes Gavin Lewis.

Neville Spencer reviews a new book by Canadian socialist and political economist Michael Lebowitz.

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