Environment

The Robbery of Nature demonstrates the importance of understanding nature and society with a Marxist perspective, writes Neville Spencer.

Despite appearances, the federal government is continuing to drag its feet on stopping the export of toxic waste to poor countries, reports Patrick McDonald.

Opponents of the federal push for a national nuclear waste dump near Kimba, South Australia, argue it is unnecessary and dangerous, writes Renfrey Clarke.

It is no accident that nuclear energy has resurfaced in the public debate as a more widespread public understanding about the necessary transition to renewables takes place, anti-nuclear activists tell Paul Gregoire.

The people of Sydney are facing not one, but five proposed waste incinerators, writes Susan Price. If built, they would create thousands of tonnes of toxic ash per year and release dangerous air pollutants.

The interim report into the Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements found fault with all levels of government, but it is yet to comment on the cause of the catastrophic Black Summer fires, writes Jim McIlroy.

The devastating ecological impact of Melbourne's North East Link tollway project should force its rethink, writes Mary Merkenich.

Following the tragic ammonium nitrate explosion in Beirut, Stephen O'Brien writes that Orica needs to do more than issue reassurances that its stockpile of the explosive on Kooragang Island is safe. 

Ecuador was the first country in the world to enshrine the rights of nature in its constitution. But, as Anthony Amis reports, international mining companies have been given the green light to exploit the country’s copper and gold reserves.

The federal government’s response to the pandemic demonstrates how feasible it is to make dramatic changes in a short period of time, argues Alex Bainbridge.

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