environment

Stop Adani activists protested at GHD offices around the country calling on the engineering firm to cut ties with Adani. The protests were part of a week of action that began on October 21.

Speakers at the Animal Activist Forum 2019.

More than 200 people from across the country attended the annual Animal Activist Forum, which was held this year at Melbourne Town Hall over October 19-20.

A Marxist critique of society remains incomplete if it does not consider the fact that, to make profits, capitalists have to not only exploited workers but also nature and animals.

Australian mining companies are making a killing in Africa — literally.

Between 2004-15, Australian-listed mining companies were linked to more than 380 mine-related deaths in several African countries, according to the Centre for Public Integrity and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists.

“It seems that towns in western New South Wales are being shut down and nobody is listening,” local resident Mark Merritt told Green Left Weekly on the banks of a non-existent river.

A protest by NT Traditional Owners outside Origin Energy's AGM

Northern Territory Traditional Owners delivered a message to Origin Energy that they do not give permission to frack for shale gas, outside the company's AGM in Sydney on October 16.

Kalgoolie Super Pit

On the eve of Australia’s largest mining conference, the International Mining and Resources Conference (IMARC), which will be held in Melbourne over October 28-31, Green Left Weekly’s Zane Alcorn looks at the myriad problems that arise from a system in which mining corporations, not communities, decide what needs to be mined and where.

Climate and Capitalism editor Ian Angus takes a look at five new titles delving into crucial issues for ecosocialists.

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On Fire: The Burning Case for a Green New Deal
By Naomi Klein
Simon & Schuster (in Canada: Knopf) 2019

Bruce Shillingsworth, the Yaama Ngunna Baaka Corroboree Festival tour organiser, said on October 1 that First Nations people need to be given back the power to make key decisions about water flow and the rivers.

A global day of action on September 14 drew attention to the Turkish government’s controversial Ilisu dam project on the Tigris River in Turkish Kurdistan. The dam is already being filled and if completed would flood the 12,000-year-old town of Hasankeyf, 199 villages and 136km of the Tigris River valley.

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