Economy

Labor’s policy silence has officially been broken with leader Anthony Albanese’s Orwellian vision statement, “Jobs and the Future of Work”, in which he seeks to spells out how Australia can confront the climate crisis and ramp up coal and gas export.

Muruwari and Budjiti man Bruce Shillingsworth appeared on the ABC’s Q&A program on October 28, but not as a panellist. He was allowed to be a part of the audience, but only after what he described as a “struggle”. The show, ostensibly about “drought”, did not include a single First Nations activist.

Treasury says the economy is performing “modestly”, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has dismissed calls for additional stimulus spending & Reserve Bank of Australia chief Philip Lowe predicts growth will return to “trend” over the next year.
So nothing to worry about, right?

The economy is clearly in the doldrums and the situation only looks like getting worse — at least for the poor.

There are celebrations in Ecuador. They began on October 13, when the government and the Indigenous movement, centrally grouped in the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador (CONAIE), announced they had reached an agreement on Decree 883, which removed fuel subsidies.

The response was twofold.

In a victory for the social movement that brought Ecuador’s capital, Quito, to a halt for 11 days, Decree 883 — which had scrapped fuel subsidies — was finally repealed on October 15, writes Jelena Rudd from Quito.

Banks Alan Moir

Federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg's announcement of yet another inquiry into the banking sector is just the latest attempt by the Coalition government to pretend it is doing something about the crimes of the Big Four banks.

A sophisticated greenwashing industry has emerged over the past few decades to not just mask the environmental destruction of corporations while blaming consumers, but to also present the climate crisis as a neutral and natural disaster, disconnected from a system of inequality. In fact, the climate crisis shows the wrong people are running the world, writes Tamara Pearson.

A public debate has erupted over a decision by Moreland council, in Melbourne’s inner-north, to install armrests on benches outside Coburg Library.

Of all the points raised by the federal government in its latest bid to drug test welfare recipients, no one seems willing to say the obvious: just let the unemployed get wasted if they want.

Pages

Subscribe to Economy