Economy

The corporate vultures are circling the ailing National Broadband Network after the federal government said it will spend money on it. Jim McIlroy argues it should not be readied for sale but stay in public hands.

Democrats are pulling out all stops to kick socialist Green Party candidates Howie Hawkins and Angela Walker off the ballot for the upcoming election, writes Barry Sheppard.

Organised white-collar crime — moving dirty money for people and companies — has became a whole lot easier. Meanwhile, Suzanne James reports, banks remain untouchable.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg is floating bringing forward billions of dollars worth of income tax cuts for the rich, arguing it will boost the COVID-19-ravaged economy. Jim McIlroy argues it won't help our economy and nor will the government's push for more gas. 

The free trade agreement between the European Union and Mercosur will benefit EU multinationals, but poses serious disadvantages for industries in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay, writes Veronica Ocvirk.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern’s personality is undoubtedly a factor in her appeal. But, politically, Ardern represents a form of centrist politics that has failed to address the challenges of our time, argues Ani White.

Peter Boyle argues growing inequality is not just unfair, it increases the power of vested interests to ignore the climate emergency and seek bigger subsidies for a recession-recovery plan built around the expansion of fossil fuel exports.

Much of the praise for Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's handling of the COVID-19 pandemic is justified, writes Bronwen Beechey. However, New Zealand's existing inequalities remain, and have potentially deepened during the pandemic.

Last year was a very good year for the world’s wealthiest individuals, writes David Ruccio.

For the first time in 23 years, 2.5 million pensioners will not receive their half yearly adjusted pension rise, writes George Zangalis.

Pages

Subscribe to Economy