Economy

Labor leader Anthony Albanese’s budget reply speech failed to offer an alternative course to the Coalition government’s gas and arms export-based vision, argues Peter Boyle.

Chris Slee takes a look at a new book that explores the huge environmental cost of China's rapid economic growth over the past 40 years.

Bosses could hardly contain their glee at the 2020-21 budget. It is hardly surprising, writes Peter Boyle, given that it was a massive corporate handout.

Message from the Future II: The Years of Repair is an animated short film that dares to dream of a future in which 2020 is a historic turning point, writes Susan Price.

Tuesday’s budget is on everybody’s mind. Most people will be looking for whatever life buoys Treasury throws, writes Suzanne James.

A recent poll shows if opposition candidate Andrés Arauz Galarza is allowed to run in Ecuador’s presidential election next year, he will win, write Vijay Prashad and Pilar Troya. But, if the ruling bloc in Ecuador has its way, Arauz will not be sworn in as the next president in 2021.

The corporate vultures are circling the ailing National Broadband Network after the federal government said it will spend money on it. Jim McIlroy argues it should not be readied for sale but stay in public hands.

Democrats are pulling out all stops to kick socialist Green Party candidates Howie Hawkins and Angela Walker off the ballot for the upcoming election, writes Barry Sheppard.

Organised white-collar crime — moving dirty money for people and companies — has became a whole lot easier. Meanwhile, Suzanne James reports, banks remain untouchable.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg is floating bringing forward billions of dollars worth of income tax cuts for the rich, arguing it will boost the COVID-19-ravaged economy. Jim McIlroy argues it won't help our economy and nor will the government's push for more gas. 

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