sexual assault

Scott Morrison says the government is taking sexual assault seriously, but how can it when it is not going to investigate historical complaints? Sonia Hickey reports.

New South Wales Police Commissioner Mick Fuller’s proposal for an app that records consent reveals how willfully ignorant he and government MPs are about the institutionalised nature of sexual assault, writes Isaac Nellist.

Anti*Capitalist Resistance activists reflect on the police attack on a women’s vigil in South London.

Jackie Kriz writes that the #March4Justice movement needs to keep mobilising if it wants its demands to be met.

Pip Hinman reports on the huge #March4Justice protests, organised in 10 days, showing how angry women are about sexual violence and the way it continues to be excused, dismissed and normalised.

The #March4Justice rallies and marches across the country on March 14-15 are making a clear statement about the need to end sexual violence and rape in workplaces. Kerry Smith reports.

After many years of campaigning, Argentina’s feminist movements booked a historic victory when abortion was finally legalised, writes Virginia Tognola.

The Redfern Legal Centre is calling on the NSW Police to release its internal operating procedures on investigating an alleged sexual assault, writes Kerry Smith.

Janine Hendry, Sarah Hathway and Kamala Emanuel discuss the issues around sexual assault and profile the March4Justice on March 15.

The upsurge in organising against sexual violence shows how far we have come but also how far we need to go, writes Pip Hinman.

2018 abortion rights protest in Argentina. Photo: Lara Va/Wikimedia Commons CC: SA 4.0

While Argentina just legalised abortion rights, it is prohibited or limited in most of Latin America, writes Tamara Pearson. For those forced to continue a pregnancy deprives them of agency, autonomy and well being.

Former NSW Labor leader Luke Foley was forced to resign on November 7 after ABC journalist Ashleigh Raper alleged that he put his hand inside her dress and into her underpants without her consent at a 2016 Christmas party.

The size — and composition — of the national vigils for comedian Eurydice Dixon on June 18 has given us some hope that with a growing awareness about violence against women we can achieve at least some of the measures we so desperately need.

Not since the community response to Jill Meagher’s murder in 2012 have so many people taken to the streets to demand that women have the right to live free of fear.

The rape and murder of comedian Eurydice Dixon in Melbourne on June 12 has prompted a nationwide discussion about the endemic nature of male violence against women, as well as a push for solutions — short and long-term.

MARGARITA WINDISCH, a sexual assault councillor and educator on family violence at Victoria University, spoke to 3CR on June 18. Below is a transcript of her remarks. The full Podcast can be found here.

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I’m pleased there has been a swift backlash to the Victorian police urging women to take responsibility for their safety after the murder of Eurydice Dixon on June 12.

The police response is both ridiculous and misogynist. It puts the onus on women to avoid being attacked.

The logical extension of their approach is for women to stay at home, and only go out with a male chaperone.

A new report, entitled Don’t send me that pic, has reaffirmed what most women and girls already knew: sexual abuse and harassment are incessant, it starts young and it is on the rise.

Commissioned by Plan Australia and Our Watch, the survey collected responses from 600 girls and young women aged 15–19 across Australia.

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