Our Common Cause

A showdown is looming in Australia between corporate media giants, with the federal government keen to appear as if it is taking a stand for media diversity. Jacob Andrewartha and Viv Miley explain.

Julian Assange is facing a show trial, designed to warn any whistleblower and journalist not to go down the same path. He is not on trial for any crime, but rather for exposing them, argues Sam Wainwright.

Peter Boyle argues growing inequality is not just unfair, it increases the power of vested interests to ignore the climate emergency and seek bigger subsidies for a recession-recovery plan built around the expansion of fossil fuel exports.

Alan Tudge says "foreign actors" are "straining" the country's social cohesion. Alex Bainbridge argues that if he was seriously worried, he could start by looking in the mirror.

The federal government’s response to the pandemic demonstrates how feasible it is to make dramatic changes in a short period of time, argues Alex Bainbridge.

Three unions have called for the scrapping of the working holiday visa program, claiming it will lead to better wages. But will it? Or is it an excuse to scapegoat and play the nationalist card, asks Zane Alcorn.

The main lesson from the disgraceful treatment of the elderly during the pandemic is that the privatisation of residential aged care must end, says Sue Bolton.

Shaming is a counter-productive way of dealing with those who flout the rules. But, as Alex Bainbridge argues, it is designed to deflect attention from the systemic failures in dealing with COVID-19.

The pandemic is serious and strong action needs to be taken to stop its spread. But punitive and paternalistic interventions, that remove people’s agency, is counterproductive, writes Sue Bolton.

Bipartisan mistreatment of refugees since 2001 has been a key feature of politics in Australia. But the movement for refugee rights has won some concessions and it could win more, writes Alex Bainbridge.

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