Black Lives Matter movement

US President Donald Trump is doubling down on his race war agenda, while Democratic party mayors are succumbing to pressure and seeking to undermine the Black Lives Matter movement, writes Malik Miah.

The United States is facing a number of interrelated crises: the coronavirus; the economy; institutional racism, including police violence against African Americans; disarray in the Federal government; and climate change, writes Barry Sheppard.

The shooting of a Black Lives Matter protester by a white vigilante in New Mexico adds to a worrying escalation of attacks by far-right terrorists in the United States, writes Jack Kiley.

Socialist councillor in Seattle Kshama Sawant addressed protesters on June 10, in the wake of their takeover of Seattle’s Eighth Precinct, from which police have been driven out. 

Geoff Mirelowitz has marched and demonstrated for civil rights and against racism for more than 50 years. But the daily protests in greater Seattle have been some of the most inspiring that he has ever participated in.

The rebellion against police violence and murder continues to expand in the United States. New demands are being raised concerning issues of institutional racism by Black and Brown people and in opposition to the symbols of white genocide by Native American nations, writes Malik Miah.

The defunding and dismantling of the standing police is the first step to creating a “safety force” under community control, with the ability to prosecute bad cops and those who are rarely thrown in prison, writes Malik Miah.

Since protests erupted across the United States in response to the police murder of George Floyd, it has come to light that inaction by former Minnesota prosecutor, Democrat Amy Klobuchar meant killer cops were free to roam the streets, writes Emma Clancy.

Black men and women are murdered by cops and white thugs, and nothing happens. The criminal “justice” system legally backs the crimes of cops and racists as “justifiable”. It happens so often that African Americans initially just shrug and hold back outrage, writes Malik Miah. Then anger explodes when the truth is revealed.

The annual feminist conference, July 1 to 6, organised by the Network of Women Students of Australia (NOWSA) featured an panel of First Nations’ activists who addressed a range issues and answered questions. Kicking it off, Bridget Cama, a Wiradjuri and Fijian woman, and a previous National Union of Students and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander office bearer talked about rights, feminism and spirituality.
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