asylum seekers

Bipartisan mistreatment of refugees since 2001 has been a key feature of politics in Australia. But the movement for refugee rights has won some concessions and it could win more, writes Alex Bainbridge.

Refugees in the Kangaroo Point detention centre are making a passionate cry for freedom and their supporters, outside, are giving them hope, writes Alex Bainbridge.

Refugee and asylum seeker supporters began an occupation on May 12 of the Mantra Hotel in Preston, Melbourne, where more than 65 asylum seekers are being held under guard, reports Kerry Smith.

With protesting suspended, the refugee movement is exploring new ways to express solidarity with those left in precarious situations in their continuing detention hell, writes Zebedee Parkes.

Refugees and supporters protested outside the Department of Immigration in Sydney on August 12 to demand a fair process, permanent protection and family reunion pathways.

With the re-election of the Coalition government, conservatives have become emboldened to intensify their agenda of transferring even more wealth and power to the already dominant at the expense of the rest of us, writes Nick Fredman.

The #KidsOffNauru campaign is gaining momentum with a range of protests organised across Australia in recent days.

Médecins Sans Frontières Australia has disputed home affairs minister Peter Dutton’s version of events which led to the organisation being told by the Nauruan government to leave on October 5.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s “I stopped these [boats]” desk trophy is symbolic of his government’s callous disregard for human rights. But you can be sure that Morrison won’t be stopping the Nauruan government from kicking Mؘédicins Sans Frontières (MSF/Doctors Without Borders) off Nauru.

Within days of Nauru’s decision that MSF’s mental health services would “no longer be required”, news came through that an Iranian detainee on Nauru had self-harmed by swallowing washing powder.

Refugee rights activists rallied outside Qantas offices in Sydney and Jetstar offices in Melbourne on August 9 as part of a national campaign calling on the Qantas airline to refuse to deport asylum seekers to danger.

A number of airlines around the world are refusing to take part in deportations. However, Qantas and Virgin Australia have, so far, not joined the boycott.

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