anti-terrorism laws

Civil Liberties Australia said new powers to allow intelligence agents to manipulate and omit data will likely lead to the manufacturing of evidence. Paul Gregoire reports.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has closed down federal parliament, ostensibly for health reasons, and placed corporate CEOs at the helm of his new National COVID-19 Coordination Commission. Paul Gregoire takes aim at this blatant power grab.

With the re-election of the Coalition government, conservatives have become emboldened to intensify their agenda of transferring even more wealth and power to the already dominant at the expense of the rest of us, writes Nick Fredman.

While the debate on free speech has largely focused on the "rights" of racists and bigots, federal and state governments have been quietly passing new laws that strip citizens of the freedom of speech that is essential to democratic deliberation.

I think it was anthropologist who once said that Australians are in constant fear of their country being stolen — again. Australia has a history of policy-making based on the fear of the outsider. But of all the acts of government based on that fear the new Home Affairs portfolio of Peter Dutton will rank as one of the most dangerous.

Heavily armed “anti-terrorist” police raided homes in Melbourne and arrested a teenager in Sydney on May 17. This foiled two unrelated terror plots, according to saturation media coverage based on information from police and security agencies that is too secret to be heard in court. In Sydney, 18-year-old Tamim Khaja was arrested in Parramatta and charged with planning a terrorist attack and preparing for “foreign incursions”.
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