1991 Royal Commission into Black Deaths in Custody

February 14 marks 18 years since young Kamilaroi man TJ Hickey died after being chased by police. No one has been charged; his family is yet to receive any justice, writes Isaac Nellist.

The family of Gunnai, Gunditjmara and Wiradjuri man Raymond Noel Lindsay Thomas has waited four years to have their views on Victoria Police's practices and procedures heard in court, reports Chris Peterson.

Amanda Porter and Helen Corbett discuss the campaign to stop Black deaths in custody, and the significance of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal deaths in custody.

End Black deaths in custody protest in Perth on April 15. Photo: Alex Salmon

A protest to mark 30 years since the royal commission into Black deaths in custody released its findings mobilised about 1000 people, writes Alex Salmon.

Kerry Smith reports that protests were organised to mark the 30th anniversary of the handing down of the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Black Deaths in Custody.

Suzanne James writes that until systemic racial profiling ends, Black deaths in custody will continue and the 1991 royal commission's recommendations will not be implemented.

Caroline Andersen writes about the pain of the death in custody of her son Wayne 'Fella' Morrison and why she has little confidence in the justice system.

Sue Bolton argues only a sustained mass movement, led by First Nations people, will have a chance of dismantling the racist and repressive system which criminalises people on the basis of their skin colour.

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