World

By Ian Powell WELLINGTON - New Zealand's largest protest for a decade stunned the National Party government on April 4. Around 100,000 people participated in nationwide demonstrations which were part of the Council of Trade Unions' April 3-9 week
By Laszlo Andor and Peter Annear BUDAPEST — Hungarians' originally high expectations about the transition to a Western-style market economy have, in the last few months, started to recede. While the old regime and its political elite have gone,
By Norm Dixon The Botswanan government has suspended the dredging of the Okavango River delta in response to mounting local and international opposition. The announcement has brought a temporary halt to a giant scheme that would severely damage
By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — Opinion polling has come to the USSR. The polls are not always well designed or professionally executed, and it pays to check who has commissioned them. But the better ones are authoritative and provide intriguing data
By David Robie AUCKLAND — Tonga's hasty legal juggling act to grant citizenship to more than 400 foreigners has done little to quell unrest in the South Pacific kingdom over the passport scandal. Although commoner parliamentarian and
By Andrew Nette Crispin Beltran, chairperson of the May 1 Movement (KMU) of the Philippines, has been jailed on two fabricated charges — one a matter outstanding for 20 years — and leaders of the movement fear that the government of Corazon
By Judy Addison and Jeannie Rae Indonesian workers have taken advantage of increased political instability, as jockeying for power increases in the government and military, to form a new, independent, trade union. The organisers are also keen to
By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — It was one of the tensest days Muscovites had experienced in some time. The immediate cause of the strained atmosphere was a decision by the liberal majority in the Moscow City Soviet to call a mass demonstration to
By Norm Dixon Japan's most serious nuclear power accident has given the anti-nuclear movement a powerful impetus. Japan barely escaped a nuclear accident of Chernobyl or Three Mile Island proportions on February 9, when a pipe broke inside the
By Norm Dixon SYDNEY — "The president of the white people, F.W. de Klerk (he's not my president as I never elected him, I have no voting rights in South Africa), has been doing the rounds telling the international community that apartheid is at an
By Norm Dixon Mecky Salosa, a senior leader of the Free West Papua Movement (OPM), which is fighting for independence of Indonesian-occupied West Papua, was sentenced to life imprisonment on March 18 by an Indonesian District Court in Jayapura.
By Steve Painter Five days of mass protests shook the Yugoslav and Serbian capital, Belgrade, in mid-March. Two people were killed and up to 160 injured as police, backed briefly by army tanks, attacked the protesters. The tanks were withdrawn after
Since 1986, about 1 million civilians have fled their homes to escape the fighting in the Philippines. The plight of this destitute, homeless tribe — "internal refugees" — is still not fully recognised by the Aquino government. DAVID ROBIE
Tirana, Washington resume relations By Peter Annear PRAGUE — After 52 years without diplomatic contact, the United States agreed to restore full diplomatic relations with Albania on March 15. Talks on resuming ties were virtually completed
Finns for fuel efficiency By a big majority, the people of Finland prefer greater energy efficiency to the building of new power plants, according to a poll published on February 26. Commissioned by Greenpeace and conducted in January, the
Student demonstrations, a military clampdown and an emigre exodus have marked the lead-up to Albania's first multiparty elections, scheduled for March 31. From Prague, Green Left correspondent PETER ANNEAR reports. The exodus of 20,000 Albanians

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