World

The decision by United States President Donald Trump not to bomb Iran in retaliation for its missile strikes against US military bases in Iraq (themselves retaliation for the assassination of Iranian military commander Qasem Soleimani) has eased fears that the US would launch another war in the Middle East.

A survey released on the eve of the World Economic Forum has found that just 18% of people believe capitalism is working for them.

Unsurprisingly, the poll, conducted by public relations firm Edelman, also found that trust in capitalist institutions remains higher among "wealthier, more educated, and frequent consumers of news” than the mass population.

According to the report, "distrust is being driven by a growing sense of inequity and unfairness in the system".

The United States is continuing to muscle the governments of Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala to stop the flow of refugees across its border.

Many migrants are fleeing the consequences of US political intervention and economic policy in the region. They choose to travel in “caravans” for safety.

Immigration officers have gone on the offensive against the caravans, writes Tamara Pearson.

The Yazidi minority community in Sinjar, Iraq, is still recovering from the horrendous 2014 genocide by Islamic State (IS) terrorists. Yet, on January 15, it was the target of another deadly airstrike by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan's dictatorial regime.

Lebanese Prime Minister Hassan Diab announced a new government on January 21. The cabinet, made up of technocratic ministers backed by the main parties, is promising to tackle the country's deep economic crisis.

Protests are continuing, however, as the announcement falls short of the movement’s key demands for a government independent of the ruling parties and new elections.

Karim Traboulsi reports on the protest movement, which shows no sign of letting up.

Rohingya refugees living in a refugee camp in Bangladesh are  just surviving, as they look towards the day when they can return to their homeland, writes Paul Gregoire.

Following United States President Donald Trump’s speech at the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland, climate activist Greta Thunberg delivered this stinging rebuke to the world’s leaders for their failure to take serious action on climate change:

Bolivians will return to the polls on May 3, almost five months after former president Evo Morales was ousted in a coup. Having been declared the winner of the October 20 election, the leader of the Movement Towards Socialism (MAS) was forced to resign three weeks later after opposition protests denouncing fraud culminated in the police and military calling on Morales to step down.

The cracks in Prime Minister Emmanuel Macron's neoliberal government are beginning to show and the strikes are continuing to broaden, writes John Mullen.

On January 14–17, fresh strikes and demonstrations took place across France.

According to media reports, several French ports were blocked by a 72-hour strike by members of the Confédération Générale du Travail (CGT), as part of the ongoing mass transportation strikes over Prime Minister Emanuel Macron’s attacks on the pension system.

The CGT called a 72-hour walk-out starting from January 14 and for pickets on January 17, in what the union has called “opération ports morts” (operation dead ports).

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