World

Vietnam ‒ the country US generals once tried to “bomb into the stone age” ‒ is quietly leading the world in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, writes Peter Boyle.

Climate scientists and campaigners reiterated their demands for urgent global action to dramatically reduce planet-heating emissions in response to a new record-breaking concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, writes Jessica Corbett.

Every degree of global warming will push a billion people out of the human survival zone, writes Ian Angus.

Oil corporations are environmentally destructive and have funded a tsunami of misinformation about climate change, actively undermining the public’s trust of science and state institutions, writes Rupen Savoulian. Their product is now technically worthless. So why should public money be used to rescue a harmful industry?  

Sentencing former President Rafael Correa to eight years in jail is a desperate move by a repressive administration trapped in a crisis of its own making, writes Denis Rogatyuk.

In the midst of a coronavirus pandemic, the world is facing a doubling in the number of global poor. But governments focusing on huge rescue packages to save corporations, including those registered in tax havens, from taking too big a hit, writes Astrid Paulsson.

The Palestinian response to COVID-19 has been very successful but, as Mark Govier writes, they still need help.

Venezuela is confronting COVID-19 amid foreign sanctions, mercenary incursions and rising incidents of looting and riots. Green Left’s Federico Fuentes speaks to National Network of Commune Activists spokesperson Atenea Jiménez about the situation on the ground.

Already immersed in an overlapping health and economic crisis, Brazil is now also being engulfed by a political crisis. Sao Paulo University professor André Singer outlines some of the key dynamics underpinning the current situation in Brazil.

For those with economic or political power, the coronavirus pandemic is nothing more than a carnival of crisis and possibilities, writes Tamara Pearson.

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