International News

By Robert Graham The chances for peace in El Salvador are closer than ever before according to Dr Gorka Garate, a leading aid and development worker from El Salvador. Speaking at a public meeting in Fremantle, Garate said that the recent

By Angela Matheson BUDAPEST — The Cafe Hungaria is renowned for serving the best coffee in the city. For most of this century, waiters have pushed mahogany cake trolleys around the art nouveau interior to expectant customers' tables. But these

Fallout from the Yugoslav civil war and the failed Soviet coup is currently dominating Hungarian politics, benefiting the ruling rightist Hungarian Democratic Forum (MDF), reports LASZLO ANDOR from Budapest. Eighteen months after national

Approximately 6000 big companies are included in Czechoslovakia's so-called large privatisation program, two-thirds of them in a "first wave" and the remainder in a "second wave", with others at least temporarily held aside. Company managers had

By Sean Malloy Palestine Liberation Organisation leader Yasser Arafat has called for an Arab summit to work out a coordinated negotiating position at the Middle East peace conference which opens in Madrid on October 30. The US-organised

By Neville Spencer Twenty months after his "arrest" on drug trafficking charges, Manuel Noriega's trial is under way in Miami, but it is much more than Noriega's future that is at stake. The defence case largely revolves around the allegation

By Tracy Sorensen SYDNEY — Senior SBS television reporter Vladimir Lusic spent seven weeks in Croatia and Serbia until early October. He drank with journalists at Zagreb's Hotel Intercontinental, went out into the battle zones with units of the

By Norm Dixon The people of Cuba are mobilising to overcome the severe economic crisis imposed upon them by the sudden disruption to Cuba's trade with the Soviet Union. Cuba has been forced to rely heavily on Soviet trade by the 30-year US

By Sally Low PRAGUE — The Czechoslovak parliament on October 4 passed the harshest political screening law so far enacted in any east European country since 1989. All people who, at any time between February 1948 and November 1989, held

By Max Lane President Suharto is seeking to silence outspoken members of the parliament as his regime moves to ensure his 1993 re-election or a smooth succession. Jockeying has begun over the membership of the next parliament and MPR [the

Roy Medvedev was the leading dissident Soviet historian during the Brezhnev years. He was expelled from the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1969. In 1971, following the publication in the West of his monumental study on Stalin, Let History

By Peter Annear PRAGUE — As the pattern of the Serbian-federal army assault on Croatia starts to jell, and the contested regions are more clearly identified, it is evident that economic designs and not national antipathies are the prime source

By Peter Annear PRAGUE — When 400 peace campaigners set out at the end of September in buses on the road from Trieste through Croatia, Vojvodina, Serbia and Bosnia-Hercegovina to Sarajevo, they made a small breach in the war mentality that has

By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — Russian President Boris Yeltsin appears to have blocked local authority elections called by the Russian parliament for December 8. In its October 16 issue, the liberal Independent Newspaper reported that a

By Peter Annear and Sally Low PRAGUE — "I have been a fighter against communism for 40 years", Norman Willis, the general secretary of the British Trades Union Congress, told a press conference here on October 18. Willis was with an

S tries to block UN debate NEW YORK — The US government is conducting an intensive campaign at the United Nations to block a debate on the US economic embargo against the Caribbean country, Cuba's UN mission stated on October 25. The need to

By Sally Low Jablonec nad Nisou — This is a pretty Czech town whose name (apple tree on the Nisa River) is a memorial to all that was left standing by Catholic crusaders during one of their wars against Protestant Bohemia. In the foothills of

By Steve Painter South Yorkshire police have paid more than half a million pounds (around A$1.2 million) compensation to mineworkers arrested at the Orgreave coking plant in June 1984. Orgreave was the centre of bitter clashes between police and

By Steve Painter Workers at Fiji's Vatukoula gold mine are into their ninth month on strike and say they expect to spend Christmas on the picket line. The strike has restricted production so severely that the company recorded a $20 million loss

Roy Medvedev was the leading dissident Soviet historian during the Brezhnev years. He was expelled from the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1969. In 1971, following the publication in the West of his monumental study on Stalin, Left History

NIEVES ALEMANY (a member of the national secretariat of the Cuban Women's Federation, the National Assembly of Cuba and the central committee of the Communist Party of Cuba) and EVA SEONE (vice-president of the Cuban Institute for the Friendship with

At least two, and possibly four, Timorese were killed in a church in Dili when Indonesian troops attacked it early in the morning of October 28. TAPOL, the Indonesia Human Rights Campaign, identified the known victims as Sebastiao Ranel, 18 years,

More Turkish raids on Kurds By Steve Painter According to the London-based Kurdistan Information Centre, about 40 Turkish bombers attacked Kurdish villages in northern Iraq towards the end of October with weapons including napalm, phosphorous bombs

BOGDAN BOGDANOVIC is Yugoslavia's best known contemporary architect. A Serb born in Belgrade in 1922, he fought with the partisans during World War II. A former professor of architecture at the University of Belgrade, he was also the mayor of

By Ken Davis 1500 people, women and men, black and white, marched through Johannesburg's inner-city districts of Braamfontein and Hillbrow on October 12 in South Africa's second annual gay and lesbian pride week. According to Simon Nkoli, MC of the

Malaysian-Korean logging threat to Guyana The Guyanese government has just leased more than 1.65 million hectares of forest to a foreign consortium. The logging operation seriously threatens the livelihoods of local communities and the ecology of

By Peter Annear and Sally Low in Wroclaw and Warsaw A failure to resolve, or even to seriously address, underlying factors in Poland's political, social and economic crisis was the foremost outcome of the country's "first free elections" since

By Irina Glushchenko MOSCOW — A significant breach has been opened in the liberal-bureaucratic monopoly of the Russian press. While the main daily newspapers still trumpet the virtues of the "free market" with a brazenness that would make Rupert

By Poul Funder Larsen MOSCOW — While the first autumn snow fell lightly, at least 10,000 people, and up to 50,000 according to some media, assembled on October 23 in the Manezh square in central Moscow. This was the first demonstration in which

By Russell Anderson From 3000 to 5000 East Timorese accompanied the coffin of Sebastian Gomez through the streets of Dili chanting independent slogans. Gomez was shot by Indonesian soldiers early in the morning of October 28 outside Montael

US bombs targeted at Korea By Tracy Sorensen SYDNEY — 1>North Korean Workers' Party representative Kim Yong Sun, visiting Australia at the invitation of the Socialist Party of Australia, told a meeting on November 7 that the Australian

By Norm Dixon South African industry ground to a halt during a general strike on November 4-5, called to protest against the introduction of a new indirect tax that will hit the poor hardest. The Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) is

Farmers protest in Prague By Peter Annear PRAGUE — In the first big display of social resistance to the harsh effects of the government's economic reform program, about 25,000 Czech farmers demonstrated in Wenceslas Square in the heart of Prague

By Michael Tardif Political opposition in Indonesia today is largely led by university students. In contrast with the 1970s generation, student activists today have a strong orientation of solidarity with other sectors of society, primarily peasants

The African National Congress, the Pan Africanist Congress and 92 other anti-apartheid organisations have agreed to form a Patriotic Front. This will strengthen the anti-apartheid movement, allowing it to enter constitutional negotiations with a

By John Hallam THANNIRPALLI, Tamil Nadu — My wife Mishka Jambor and I attended the World Conference of Religions held in the town of Cochin in Kerala, South India, October 1-6. At that meeting, more than 350 representatives of the Hindu,

By Emlyn Jones More destruction was caused by tropical storm Thelma in the central Philippines than has been caused in the past by much bigger storms. Worst affected was he town of Ormoc on the island of Leyte, where thousands of bodies were left

By Satendra Prasad SUVA — Police have begun another round of repression against civil rights activists campaigning against Fiji's racist 1990 constitution. Members of the Fiji Youth and Students League (FYSL) and several trade unionists went

By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — The savage free-market "reforms" of Russian President Boris Yeltsin are certain to encounter large-scale, organised worker resistance. This was clear by the afternoon of November 7, following the largest and angriest

Philippines logging companies, together with sections of the military, are suspected of involvement in the murder of an environmental activist, Father Nery Lito Satur. Father Satur, a parish priest from Valencia in Mindanao, was killed on October

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