International News

By Peter Annear PRAGUE — The Czech-based Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia (KSCM) has come under extreme pressure as a result of the attempted Soviet coup. Divisions within the party, and within the 24-member federal council it forms with

By Norm Dixon Cuba has demanded that the United States government close the Guantánamo Naval Base. The base, opened in 1903, was imposed on Cuba after US troops occupied the island during war with Spain in 1898. There are growing fears

From Milan and Turin, SALLY LOW concludes a report on trade union politics in the Italian car industry. After passage of a law to reduce the sliding scale, which tied wages to inflation, a strong movement based on the workers councils emerged in

By Robert Went AMSTERDAM — More than 600,000 workers went on strike during part of the day on September 17 as part of the campaign by three trade union federations against cuts in social security announced by the government. Trade union leaders

By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — Within weeks of the defeat of the August coup, important sections of the Russian democratic movement have come out in public opposition to actions of President Boris Yeltsin and his associates. In the second week of

By Norm Dixon The United Nations General Assembly, which convened on September 17, has been asked to put on its agenda the US government's end crippling 30-year economic, commercial and financial blockade against Cuba. The agenda will be

By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — It was, one of the participants remarked, like a bizarre flashback to the early days of the Russian democratic movement in 1988. Opposite the city soviet building, beneath the outstretched arm of the equestrian statue

By Tony Iltis Two million people are at risk of famine in Ethiopia and Eritrea, reports David Armstrong of Community Aid Abroad, who recently returned from Ethiopia. The overthrow on May 28 of dictator Mengistu Haile Mariam, ending a 17-year

By Peter Annear PRAGUE — Among all the countries of Eastern Europe, Czechoslovakia has been regarded as the most likely to succeed in the transition to a market economy. Its economy is stronger than others and it is not troubled by a massive

By Michele Lee On August 28, the village of Kijevo (population 1000), a Croat enclave in the middle of the so-called Serb Autonomous Region of Krajina, ceased to exist, having been razed to the ground by the Yugoslav army deploying aircraft, tanks

By John Mettam "Cuban athletes have stunned their larger, richer neighbours", the International Herald Tribune reported in its coverage of last month's Pan American Games. In number of participants and countries represented, the Pan American

By Mikael Hidayat JAKARTA — Sana, 19, and a group of fellow Timorese workers first came here in hope of a life better than that to be found in Timor. Their expectations had been raised by the promise of jobs in a Jakarta hotel. The promise

By Peter Annear Following its September 8 referendum on independence, Macedonia could become a new flashpoint in the Yugoslav civil war. With a 75% turnout, 98% of voters favoured a sovereign and independent Macedonia which would have the right to

Carmen Maclean Violating a United Nations peace plan, the Moroccan government has resumed its war against Western Sahara. Morocco first invaded Western Sahara in 1975. A cease-fire was due to come into effect on September 6. This was to be

The United Nations has appealed for $400 million in aid to help an estimated 22 million people affected by drought and civil war in the Horn of Africa. One of the countries worst afflicted is Sudan. The UN estimates that 8 million people in Sudan

The South African Communist Party is debating its vision for a democratic and socialist South Africa and its role in bringing it about. A document called Building Workers' Power for Democratic Change — the draft manifesto of the SACP — is

By Ian Powell WELLINGTON — There has been a dramatic shift in the popularity of New Zealand's political parties. A Morgan Gallup opinion poll conducted last month recorded a striking increase in support for the left-wing NewLabour Party from

By Peter Annear The federal army is now an independent factor in the national conflict in Yugoslavia, Sonja Licht, co-convener of the Helsinki Citizens Assembly, an eastern European peace and human rights watchdog, told Green Left Weekly in

By Sally Low PARIS — While the 10th anniversary in May of his election as president was an occasion for glowing eulogies to Socialist Party leader Francois Mitterrand, he and his party's government are now suffering from widespread

Berlin strike against discrimination By Will Firth BERLIN — Monday-morning traffic in East Berlin and parts of West Berlin was seriously disrupted on September 9 by a warning strike of public transport workers. It was supported by the

Political evictions in Prague By Sally Low PRAGUE — The International Union of Students, the World Federation of Trade Unions and the International Organisation of Journalists are fighting moves by the Czechoslovak government to evict them

By Peter Annear BELGRADE — An incident illustrates the tragedy that is unfolding in Yugoslavia. It is 4 a.m. Dawn has not yet broken. On the line from Budapest to Belgrade, our train pulls into lonely Subotica, the rail crossing and immigration

By Rosemary Evans Which small country, often in the news, never provides TV journalists with images of police violently charging protesters (with or without tear gas), of faces consumed with murderous hatred, of fleeing civilians, of cars in

New York — Cuban foreign minister Isidoro Malmierca told the United Nations on October 1 that the US government has prepared plans for a full-scale invasion of the Caribbean island nation. "While spokespeople for the Washington administration

Increasing attacks on foreigners By Bryan R. Thomas BONN — A recent study conducted from Leipzig by Professor Walter Friedrich show that intolerance towards foreigners is not just a new phenomenon in the former German Democratic Republic.

By Will Firth BERLIN — A steadily increasing stream of refugees and migrants is reaching Western Europe. One-half of them arrive in Germany. Immigration offices are overwhelmed by the influx — as I learned first hand in endless queues for a

By Colin Pemul A unique island ecosystem in Indonesia may vanish within a few months. Siberut, lying off the west coast of Sumatra, has been geographically isolated for at least half a million years. In 1980 the World Wildlife Fund conducted a

By Tracy Sorensen SYDNEY — The Latin American Unity (ULAT) group here has launched a campaign against the Spanish government's celebrations to mark the "discovery" of the Americas by Christopher Columbus almost 500 years ago. Like the

By Norm Dixon Soon after Mikhail Gorbachev's September announcement that remaining Soviet military personnel in Cuba would be withdrawn and bilateral trade would be placed on a "mutually advantageous" (i.e. hard currency) basis, the Western press

Workers in the western region of Jakarta are beginning to organise. Recently a number of large strikes have occurred in the region. The Suharto regime and the army have reacted by infiltrating every community and workplace. In Jakarta, MIKAEL HIDAYAT

By Pip Hinman Despite a heavy army presence and curfew, supporters of ousted Haitian President Jean Bertrand Aristide are still campaigning for his return and have set up barricades around the shanty towns surrounding the capital Port-au-Prince.

Sinn Fein wins Belfast council seat By Jack Holland Sinn Fein became the largest Nationalist party on Belfast council and the second largest party in the city when Joe Austin, the vice-chairman of the party's executive, won a crucial

By Mikael Hidayat BANDUNG — Of the six Bandung Institute of Technology students arrested here in 1989 for anti-government activities, four are to be released. The six, Bambang Sugianto, Enin Supriyanto, Fadjroel Rachman, Moch Djumhur Hidayat,

By David Robie AUCKLAND — Four protesters penetrated a tight security screen around Fiji coup leader Sitiveni Rabuka during his controversial address in New Zealand last week while about 100 others burnt a copy of the republican constitution in

By Angela Matheson PARIS — At the hub of the underground railway, the Metro, a student chamber orchestra from the nearby ecole earns money for course fees by playing Stravinksy. Close by a middle-aged man sits with a tin, requesting coins from

By Pip Hinman In 1492, Christopher Columbus sailed to the "New World" on behalf of Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain, beginning European colonisation of America. In the rich north, some will celebrate this event, but in South and Central

By Martin Mulligan After digging very deep into its voluminous bag of dirty tricks to secure the presidency in the 1988 elections, Mexico's ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) managed to reassert its dominance with a sweeping victory in

A declaration calling for the formation of a Russian Party of Labour was launched in Moscow at the end of August. Among the signatories were well-known socialists — including leader of the Socialist Party Boris Kagarlitsky and ANDREI ISAYEV, a

ROY MEDVEDEV became well known in the West as the leading dissident Soviet historian during the Brezhnev years. He was expelled from the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1969, when his letter to the editor of the CPSU's theoretical magazine

Solidarity activists are mobilising for a major international campaign called "East Timor: It's Time to Talk". The proposal is for round table talks between the East Timorese resistance and Indonesia under United Nations auspices. The offer has been

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