International News

German chemical case goes to court By Bryan R. Thomas BONN — Criminal proceedings have started in Frankfurt against the general managers of two of Germany's leading manufacturers of wood preservatives. This is the most serious

Malaysian groups support Timorese By Colin Pemul KUALA LUMPUR — Non-government organisations here are carrying out an educational campaign which involves showing the film Shadow over East Timor and organising group discussions. In the

By Norm Dixon South African President F.W. de Klerk has urged Israel to rapidly acquire the state arms manufacturer, Armscor. The Southscan news service reported recently that this was the main reason for de Klerk's visit to Israel last

White workers on South Africa's railways (Transnet), traditionally some of the most conservative and racist in outlook, are starting to join the predominantly black South African Railway and Harbour Workers' Union. SARHWU is affiliated with the

In 1912, Greece, Bulgaria and Serbia attacked the Turkish Ottoman Empire to carve up its last possession in Europe, Macedonia. The victors immediately fell out, and Greece, Serbia, Romania and Turkey went to war against Bulgaria. In 1922, the

Green information for government The Government Purchasing Project in the United States, founded by Ralph Nader, wants to hear from groups and individuals about innovative ways to make government a "green" consumer. It would like specific

By Chawki Salhi ALGIERS — Arising first among the petty bourgeoisie, intellectuals of lower class origin and small traders, with the support of the traditionalist sectors of the middle bourgeoisie, fundamentalism has become a mass phenomenon.

By Chawki Salhi ALGIERS — The Algerian establishment has responded to the victory of the fundamentalist Islamic Salvation Front (FIS) in the first round of the legislative elections by cancelling the second round and setting up a military

The torture of detainees in Indonesia, especially during the first days of detention, is not exceptional. In politically unstable regions like Aceh, East Timor and Irian Jaya (West Papua), torture is routine. These are the conclusions of a

By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — In the main street of Novosibirsk in western Siberia, the protest march was a kilometre in length. Thousands of members of the city's labour collectives were demanding the restoration of affordable prices for

By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — With the massacre of real wages since the new year, labour unions in Russia and the other republics of the former Soviet Union are facing the toughest test in their recent history. The response by union officials

By Ian Powell WELLINGTON — The newly formed Alliance of progressive third parties continues to perform extraordinarily well in opinion polls, suggesting that this new formation is likely to turn the country's two-party system into a

By Leslie Cagan Stepped-up US pressure on Cuba and the increasing desperation of the island nation's economic situation are prompting a surge in solidarity organising around the US. New groups are forming specifically to work for an end to

By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — As Russians gasped for breath after their first weeks of price liberalisation, how did they rate their government and its policies? Opinion polls in Moscow and St Petersburg have now provided some of the answers.

By Sally Low 1992 was supposed to be the year when one huge prosperous market would emerge in western Europe — a market that would lay the basis for giant European companies to match the US and Japan as the most successful exploiters of the

By Norm Dixon Five Australian government ministers visiting Papua New Guinea have demanded, and received, strong assurances that the government there will step up "internal security" to protect the investments of Australian big businesses.

Infant mortality in Latin America (per 1000 live births) Cuba 10.7 Costa Rica 18 Chile 20 Venezuela 35 Colombia 39 Mexico 41 El Salvador 61 Brazil 61 Peru 84 Haiti 94 Bolivia 105

By Norm Dixon Moses Havini, Australian representative of the Interim Government of Bougainville, has denied the accusation by the Papua New Guinea government that the Bougainville Revolutionary Army has taken 1000 villagers hostage in central

By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — If the buying power of wages in Australia had fallen by 80% in a year, how large would the demonstrations be in Bourke Street or the Sydney Domain? It would have to be more than the 15,000 or so people who marched

By Steve Painter The recently formed third-party Alliance threw a scare into the New Zealand political establishment with a strong performance in the February 15 Tamaki by-election. The Alliance came within 1200 votes of winning the blue ribbon

Czech bus drivers strike over budget cuts By Peter Annear PRAGUE — Members of the Independent Public Road Transport Union held a successful one-day strike on February 10 against proposed budget cuts by the government of the Czech Republic.

By Peter Annear SACRAMENTO — Exhilarating, challenging and touched by tension and trepidation were some of the phrases used here to describe the first conference of the California Green Party following its official registration as a state

Tune into Radio Free Bougainville Help break the blockade of the Bougainville. Radio Free Bougainville, the voice the interim government of Bougainville, broadcasts daily between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. on shortwave radio frequency 3.880 megahertz.

By Brian Costner A leak of radioactive water from an aged nuclear weapons plant has delayed the reactor's restart and piqued local concerns about the plant's safety. The leak was discovered on December 24, 11 days after the Department of

By Kathy Ragless For the villagers around the Sikou Gulf on the Andaman Sea in southern Thailand, destruction of the environment is an urgent problem. A non-government organisation, the Yad Fon Association, has been working with the fishing

By José A. de la Osa In 1991, Cuba achieved an infant mortality rate of 10.7 per 1000 live births. This rate, which has been achieved for two consecutive years, is the lowest in the country's entire history. Infant mortality is an

By Peter Gellert MEXICO CITY — Miguel, a 50-year-old unemployed father of five, is a Mexico City street vendor. He sells corn-on-the-cob from a card table. Miguel works 70 hours a week, and on a normal day brings home $15, only half of which

Aristocrats' ball inspires protests By Peter Annear PRAGUE — "It was open season on bow ties, fur collars and diamonds at the Opera Ball on Saturday night as a vocal, orange-pitching crowd of demonstrators showed Ivana Trump and her

By Dan Connell ADI CAIEH, Eritrea — Each afternoon a cold wind howls over the lip of the plateau, some 2500 metres above sea level, sending clouds of thick brown dirt swirling through the empty streets, deserted except for swarms of small,

Cuba is facing its worst economic crisis since the 1959 revolution, as a result of the US blockade and the collapse of economic relations with eastern Europe. MIKE TREVASKIS, who visited in December and January, reports on the measures Cubans hope

By Norm Dixon Criminal charges were laid against Fiji Trade Union Congress (FTUC) general secretary Mahendra Chaudhry on February 7 under the provisions of repressive labour laws that came into force on October 31. Chaudhry was charged with

By Norm Dixon Black education in South Africa is a state of collapse. Massive underfunding, desperate overcrowding, woeful facilities, a complete lack of textbooks, seriously underqualified teachers and government indifference have resulted in

By Craig Cormick Shortly after nominations closed for the Philippines presidential election on February 7, there were eight contenders left. Electoral authorities eliminated another 70 as "nuisance" candidates. A further 18 candidates nominated

Cuba's security council term ends By Héctor Igarza UNITED NATIONS — For both friends and foes, the Security Council will not be the same this year. Cuba completed its term as member of that body on December 31. Evaluating its two

Russian child-care falls on hard times By Irina Glushchenko MOSCOW — Alarmed by growing popular protests, the Russian government on February 3 moved to abolish taxes on the provision of food in schools and child-care centres. But for

By Keith Locke AUCKLAND — Election day, February 15, dawned rather damp in Tamaki, but it didn't affect the spirits of 600 Alliance supporters who crammed into Selwyn College to organise getting out the vote. I didn't know most of the people

By Jorge Boccanera An old Navajo poem talks of "the voice that beautifies the earth, the voice of the summit, the voice of the thunder that reverberates in the black cloud". The poem tells how the voice that beautifies the earth is silenced,

"Chonnohyup's main achievement is that it still exists!" This how Lee Young Soon, a leading figure in the Korean Trade Union Congress, or Chonnohyup, summed up the two years of employer and government repression it has experienced since the it was

By Pat Walsh Indonesia shot itself badly in the foot on November 12, when troops gunned down at least 100 East Timorese civilians outside the Santa Cruz cemetery in Dili. There have been many massacres in East Timor, starting with and

GAMINI SILVA returns from Sri Lanka with a report on a reign of terror in the troubled island. An Amnesty International report released in January 1992 highlights the continuation of extrajudicial executions, "disappearances" and torture

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