Culture

Nelson Mandela in Havana How Far We Slaves Have Come By Nelson Mandela and Fidel Castro New York: Pathfinder. 80 pp. $10.95 Reviewed by Camilo Jorquera When Nelson Mandela was released from prison, he made a point of visiting Cuba on July 26
Timely pamphlet on Timor Opening Up. Travellers' impressions of East Timor 1989-1991 Edited and compiled by Kirsty Sword and Pat Walsh Australia East Timor Association. 1991. 50 pp. $5 Available from AETA, PO Box 93, Fitzroy 3065 Reviewed by
Aftershocks Workers Cultural Action Committee Civic Playhouse, Newcastle, until November 30 Reviewed by Philip Bilton-Smith Aftershocks is six actors on a bare stage telling stories surrounding the collapse of the Newcastle Workers Club in the
Doing Well by Doing Good By Derek Tribe Reviewed by Craig Cormick Last month, October 16, was World Food Day — and on that day almost one billion people in the world went hungry, and more than 40,000 died from hunger-related diseases. For
Beware of Excellencies: A cautionary tale for Amnesty letter writers em = By Duncan Richardson Beware of Excellencies whose addresses cover A4 envelopes titles and sub-titles bulging with double bullet-proof vests. Beware especially of
Disappearing Charity Donations in Adelaide By Norman Barber Earth Friend Press. 1991 Reviewed by David Munn In 1981 the Adelaide Central Mission refused to give free second-hand furniture to a group of people who had recently moved into a group
Whose belly laughed? Political Speak By Paul Lyneham With cartoons by Ron Tandberg ABC Books, 1991 89pp. $9.95 pb Reviewed by Tracy Sorensen ABC TV's Paul Lyneham seems to have become a "media personality". Why? His humour, his insight, his
Arresting Shadows em = By Duncan Richardson Women bring out plywood figures of the disappeared, black silhouettes fill the streets, they know their way these shields in human shape confronting the batons, watercannon, machine-guns, with
Sweetown Red Shed Company Directed by Cath McKinnon Tuesday-Saturday until December 7 at Red Shed, 45 Cardwell St, Adelaide Reviewed by Liam Mitchell Red Shed has been entertaining Adelaide for five years with original Australian theatre.
Accompanied by Neil Murray, Dave Steel, Andrew O'Phee, and Bart Willoughby and Murray Cook from Mixed Relations, Aboriginal musician KEV CARMODY launched his new album, Eulogy (for a black person), before a full house at Sydney's Rose Shamrock and

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