Culture

Filmmaker Zebedee Parkes sits down with Markela Panegyres, a visual artist, to discuss the impact COVID-19 is having on the arts community. 

Carlo Sands tries to understand what is going on in the US (and Australia).

Unfree Speech is a journey of a young activist that challenges the common stereotype of modern-day youth being incompetent and apathetic, instead presenting a stark contrast of youth interested in and concerned about their futures, write Alex Salmon and Mark Tan.

French economist Thomas Piketty became something of a global phenomenon when Capital in the Twenty-First Century topped The New York Times’ Best Seller list in 2014. He has now produced a follow-up work, Capital and Ideology, writes Neville Spencer

The mass protests erupting in the United States in response to the police killing of George Floyd have led to support from some unlikely allies, writes Jacob Andrewartha.

Here's a look back at May's political news and the best new albums that related to it.

You’ve probably heard The Ballad of 1891 about the Queensland shearers’ strike. You can probably sing Kev Carmody’s From Little Things Big Things Grow about the Gurindji Walk Off at Wave Hill in 1961. But do you know the story of the Jobs for Women campaign at the Wollongong steelworks in the 1980s? Check it out at the Sydney Film Festival, writes Karen Fletcher.

Canadian socialist and feminist Suzanne Weiss begins her recent memoir with these words by W B Yeats: “There are no strangers here, only friends you have not yet met.” More than just an epigram, they describe a practice of solidarity that saved Weiss from the Holocaust and later shaped her more than six decades of activity as a life-long socialist, writes James Clark.

During 1990s, the Chicago Bulls dominated US basketball, with Michael Jordan at the centre of the team. The Last Dance gives us a nostalgic look at the rise of that dynasty, writes Alex Salmon

Hugo Weaving and Andrew Luri experiencing the healing quality of music in Hearts and Bones

Hearts and Bones is a compassionate portrayal of the refugee experience that empowers and dignifies, without romanticising the trauma and struggle, writes Annolies Truman.

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