Culture

Denied jobs at Wollongong’s steelworks, working-class migrant women refused to accept discrimination. They began a campaign for the right to work that lasted for 14 years. Women of Steel tells their story, writes Kerry Smith

Reading Joe Sacco is to walk, albeit briefly, in the shoes of those who suffer most from the unjust global balance of power, writes Andrew Chuter.

Mindful of what Deaths of Despair explains, writes Barry Healy, when US President Donald Trump said his healthcare plan was “cheaper drugs”, it was clear he was promising his base cheaper opioid addiction.

Mira Hamermesh was only 15 when she defied her Jewish parents in Nazi-Occupied Poland and fled for her life. That she survived is a wonder, and her dramatic account is engrossing and terrifying, writes Barry Healy.

Political albums from October 2020

As the fucked-up doom of the US election looms, Mat Ward looks back at October's political news and the best new music that related to it. 

Kiss the Ground is well worth viewing for those who want a better understanding of what regenerative agriculture looks like, but not of how to achieve it, writes Alan Broughton.

The Trial of the Chicago Seven retells the story of the 1969 show trial of seven high-profile activists, while stripping away much of the period's radicalism in the process, writes Alex Salmon.

Karl Marx drew on horror, gothic and fantasy literature throughout his mature works, evoking the power, wonder and terror of capital through supernatural allusions writes Aleks Wansbrough.

Neville Spencer reviews John Bellamy Foster's The Return of Nature, which examines the ecological thought of those who came after Karl Marx and were influenced by his philosophy, politics and ecology.

Alex Salmon reviews a new edition of Stephen J Pyne's book, which examines the history of fire and humanity’s attempts to shape and use it.

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