Culture

It’s been barely noticed, but last month there was an incursion of politics into sports like no other, writes Dave Zirin.

The young as they cry out

The old as they die out

The middle aged as they shout

And the silence from the so-called leaders

Engulfs our lives

 

Do something we scream at them,

The do nothings

Who knit their rugs

Of self-protection

And doing nothing

With words like

We are meeting our targets

And we are leading the world

Along with other lies

We no longer accept

 

And so we gather on our streets

While they still do nothing

Filmmakers Amanda King and Fabio Cavadini have collaborated on a number of projects about significant, but lesser known, subjects in Australian history. Together, they have now brought one of the great hidden events of labour history in this country to the big screen.

The Great Strike 1917 retells the largely forgotten story of one of Australia's biggest industrial struggles and its impact on society.

Losing Santhia: Life & Loss in the Struggle for Tamil Eelam
Ben Hillier
Interventions, 2019
150 pages

Climate and Capitalism editor Ian Angus takes a look at five new titles delving into crucial issues for ecosocialists.

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On Fire: The Burning Case for a Green New Deal
By Naomi Klein
Simon & Schuster (in Canada: Knopf) 2019

After centuries under the yoke of English rule, Irish nationalists staged failed uprisings against British rule in 1798, 1803 and 1848. By 1858, Irish freedom fighters formed the Irish Republican Brotherhood. Known as the Fenians, they recruited among Irish soldiers in the British army to overthrow the British authorities.

However by 1867, the Fenian rising was crushed and dozens of their members sentenced to up 15 years in the British penal colony of Western Australia. Once there, they sent to Fremantle Gaol. Known as the "Convict Establishment" or the "Living Tomb", and built by convict labour in the 1850s, the men were subjected to a brutal regime of forced labour and floggings.

On December 9, 1966, the Australian government signed a public agreement with the United States to build what both countries misleadingly called a “Joint Defence Space Research Facility” at Pine Gap, just outside Alice Springs.

Officially, Pine Gap is a collaboration between the Australian Department of Defence and the Pentagon’s Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency. In reality this conceals the real purpose of Pine Gap as a CIA-run spy base designed to collect signals from US surveillance satellites in geosynchronous orbit over the equator.

Below are the opening remarks by long-established West Australian artist, Lynne Tinley at the opening night of Earth Grief, a retrospective exhibition of her art. The exhibition was displayed at the Sustainable Housing for Artists and Creatives (SHAC) Colab2, White Gum Valley, Fremantle beginning on September 27.

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Grief is a passion, an emotional force; it is the dark cloud that brings the rain.

This Australian-made film dramatises the experience of a 14-year-old Cambodian boy who is tricked into boarding a fishing vessel, where he is enslaved.

If you don't hear these 10 political albums, you're missing out

Mat Ward takes a look at 10 new albums with something to say on politics and struggle around the world.

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