Culture

Shaun Micallef’s Mad as Hell on the ABC is marvellous comedy that combines humour with current affairs analysis.

Supporters' groups across the United States have taken issue with a new rule which bans the anti-fascist Iron Front symbol on banners and flags at games because it is deemed “political”.

Iconic characters in popular culture such as Sherlock Holmes, Dracula and Frankenstein's monster are in the public domain, allowing anyone to use them to create new stories. Spider-Man should be too, writes Peter Robson.

The world is literally burning up in August 2019 and there's little to get excited about, but musicians are fighting back with some strong protest music that will make you feel good. Here are the best new albums that related to this month's political news. What albums would you suggest? Comment on TwitterFacebook, or email

Green Left's Pip Hinman interviews Ross Caputi and Donna Mulhearn, two of the authors of The Sacking of Fallujah: A People's History.

Fallujah was destroyed by US forces, not once, but three times. The city of mosques had a tradition of resisting foreign occupiers, and for this it has paid heavily.

Caputi, a former US Marine who fought in the second attack on Fallujah, and Mulhearn, an anti-war activist and human shield discuss the book and what can be done today to show solidarity and support the people of Fallujah.

Dr Richard Sorge, a German communist who penetrated the innermost political and military circles of the Japanese and German governments for a decade from the mid-1930s, only ever had one good thing to say about the Nazis.

While it was Afro-American blues music that grew into rock and roll, soul music sprang from the Black tradition of gospel churches. Aretha Franklin was undoubtedly the greatest soul singer of the 60s and this film shows that she never left the church behind.

An image from a medieval translation of Avicenna's Canon

There would have been no Enlightenment without Avicenna and his successor, Averroes – who Bloch sees as forming an “Aristotelian left” trend, writes Barry Healy.

Climate and Capitalism editor Ian Angus looks at new books for green lefts on how the richest drive climate change; planning from below; the Scottish clearances; slime; and eco-socialism and practical utopias.

This unmissable play, starring Colin Friels, is a eery reminder of the still pervasive power of religion over science and the tensions between the pursuit of knowledge and the power of official ideology.

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