Culture

Thomas Solivérès in Edmond

Barry Healy suggests grabbing a glass of nice red wine, settle down and laugh watching Edmond until you hyperventilate.

10 new political albums that you've got to hear album artwork

Here's a look back at February's political news and the best new albums that related to it. What albums would you suggest? Comment on TwitterFacebook, or email

Parasite's ability to piss off right wingers, as well as the twists and turns during the film that depicts the class divide of South Korean society, make it worth watching, argues Alex Salmon.

Please Gamble Irresponsibly tracks the history of sports gambling in Australia from colonial times to the current day, where we are inundated with gambling ads on TV while ironically being told “to gamble responsibly”, writes Alex Salmon.

Cloudstreet is one heck of a theatrical experience, one that was greeted with repeated standing ovations at its Perth opening night, writes Barry Healy.

In Kochland, Charles Leonard gives us a glimpse of a company that has built itself into every aspect of US life while avoiding any accountability or transparency, writes Alex Salmon.

Bran Nue Dae

Bran Nue Dae, the first Aboriginal musical, is celebrating its 30th anniversary with a national tour. Original, eclectic, soulful and feisty its speaks of dispossession, racism, resistance and hope. The fact it is still relevant shows how little has changed since its creation, writes Annolies Truman.

Award-winning filmmaker and Hollywood star of more than 85 blockbuster films Kirk Douglas died on February 5 at the age of 103. Peter Frost recalls how Douglas helped break the notorious ban on writers and actors during the early years of the Cold War.

As our media continues to go further down the neoliberal alley with the likes of US President Donald Trump's Twitter feed haunting our social lives, you’d be surprised to find a bastion of progressive values beginning to embed itself within an unlikely sector of the economy, our gaming industry, writes Yaji Spencer.

When conversing with commoners, members of the British Royal Family are instructed to always ask the question "And what do you do?" For, after all, this gives the working class something to talk about – their job.

But Phil Shannon says it is high time the question was returned in kind by asking of the royals: "And what do you do?"

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