Cultural Dissent

By Janet Fraser I spent Friday night glued to my television. Gone With the Wind? 9.5BIJ243>155BIJ0>/.5BI>255BI> Weeks? No, Handel's oratorio Messiah. Yes, even Handel has a video clip. At 175 minutes, it's arguably the world's longest, but a video

By Kim Spurway Visiting Hours Written by Felix Mitterer Directed by David Ritchie With Gertrude Ingeborg and Barry Jones Belvoir Theatre, Sydney, to September 15 Reviewed by Kim Spurway Visiting Hours is a funny and compassionate look at

by Stuart Wax Shopping for a Better World Council on Economic Priorities 350 pp. US$6.45 Reviewed By Stuart Wax When we buy a product at a supermarket, we not only purchase an item, but we also support the company that produced it. If you

CAA Aboriginal study tour SYDNEY — Community Aid Abroad here is to host a unique tour of discovery to explore the history and culture of Aboriginal communities in far western New South Wales. The two-week tour will include meetings with local

By Ulrike Erhardt Waiting Written and directed by Jackie McKimmie With Jackie McKimmie, Noni Hazelhurst, Deborra-Lee Furness, Frank Whitten, Helen Jones, Denis Moore, Fiona Press and Ray Barrett Reviewed by Ulrike Erhadt It's amazing what

Story and photo by Kim Shipton SYDNEY — Over two nights in August, a team of six graffiti artists created and dedicated a huge mural to the people of Newtown. The mural features planet earth, US civil rights campaigner Martin Luther King and a

Thelma and Louise Directed by Ridley Scott Screenplay by Callie Khouri With Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis Reviewed by Rose McCann The fact that a film like Thelma and Louise can excite such controversy and critical comment (including being

By Peter Boyle Bran Nue Dae A documentary film by Tom Zubrycki State Film Theatre, Melbourne Reviewed by Peter Boyle I wish I hadn't missed the stage musical performance of Bran Nue Dae in Sydney last year — especially after seeing

By Steven Giese Perspecta Art Gallery of NSW until September 15 Reviewed by Steven Giese This year's Perspecta was an understandably Greinerised affair, chopped back a bit (they couldn't afford the two dimensional artists), privatised to the

By Fiona Fort The Edinburgh Years Directed by Cameron P. Mellor Reviewed by Fiona Fort The Doug Anthony Allstars, middle-class Canberra boys and musical comedy group the world loves to hate, wreak havoc once more in their new feature-length

By Noel McGuire Patrick White — A life By David Marr Random House. 727 pp. $49.95 hardback Reviewed by Noel McGuire After he won the Nobel prize, Patrick White became a Living National Treasure. The fact that, to a large extent, his work

The seven day song cycle Two: Sheila em = By Tony Smith Sheila, eyes yellowed from grief, looked into mine, glassy with shame "I love you", she said "I love you, you know." Her uncle squatting propped against the tree beside her smiled his

By Leon Harrison Milestone for Aboriginal theatre Munjong By Richard Walley State Theatre Company The Hole in The Wall Theatre Subiaco, Perth Reviewed by Leon Harrison Like the Jimmy Chi musical Bran Nue Dae, Munjong is a milestone for

Funny work from feminists Melbourne can enjoy an exhibition by feminist cartoonists until September 22. The "Out of Line" exhibitors include Hermoine the Modern Girl's creator Kaz Cooke, and others. (Why not mention them all? Jane Carafella, Trudy

High tech lays Kevin low Because of a printer cartridge with a mind of its own, Kevin Healy was unable to send The Week That Was this week. The weekly Week That Was will return next week (technology permitting).

Phil Shannon The Gulf Between Us: The Gulf War And Beyond Edited by Victoria Brittain London: Virago. 1991. 186 pp., $17.95 (pb) Reviewed by Phil Shannon The English Guardian is the voice of liberal politics, that blend of "responsible"

By Norm Dixon It amazes and frustrates me how commercial radio play lists and record sales charts have for decades been dominated by legions of mediocre, cardboard cut-out "rock" bands and "superstars" while little credit and fewer rewards find

Trading in death and destruction "Australians Trading in Death and Destruction" is the slogan used by the Renegade Activists in their campaign against the military equipment exhibition AIDEX 91. This arms bazaar is to be held in Canberra in

A million miles from commerce A million miles from commerce By Monesque BRISBANE — From out of the bush, or probably more accurately, out from the alternative set of Brisbane and neighbouring regions from Maleny to Nimbin, come two

Medical services slammed By Bill Mason BRISBANE — The Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission has criticised medical services for Aboriginal communities in north Queensland as "inadequate and culturally inappropriate", in a report tabled

By Vanessa Hearman A lot doing on the fringe By Vannessa Hearman Photo by Bronwen Beechey MELBOURNE — The Fringe Arts Festival opened here on September 7 and runs until September 28. Fringe started in 1982, intended as a huge forum for

By Debra Wirth The Modern Girls are Strong Diary, 1992 (with Hermoine the Modern Girl) By Kaz Cooke Allen & Unwin. $19.95 Reviewed by Debra Wirth Do you get to January or February (even March) of a new year, then go frantically searching

By Roderic Pitty Soviet Foreign Policy Today: Gorbachev and the new political thinking By Robert F. Miller Allen & Unwin. 1991. 210 pp. $24.95 (hc), $17.95 (pb) Reviewed by Roderic Pitty This is a superficial book by one of the many

By Norm Dixon Audiences in three states will have the opportunity to see and hear South Africa's number one reggae and recording star, Lucky Dube, and his 13-piece band, when they tour in late September and early October. Lucky's performances

A Bit of a Post Script Written and performed by Sue-Anne Post Directed by Sue Ingleton Universal Theatre, Fitzroy, till September 27 Reviewed by Bronwen Beechey The great US writer James Baldwin was fond of joking that, as a black homosexual,

The sharp pen of our poet lorikeet The Bastard Who Squashed the Grapes in Me Bag 313 poems, songs and stories By Denis Kevans Left Book Club 128 pp. $10.00 Reviewed by Bruce Copping Denis Kevans is neither an academic's poet nor the

By Peter Boyle MELBOURNE — Making its debut at the Melbourne Fringe Arts Festival is the Ilbijerri Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Theatre Co-op, which is performing a new play, Up the Road, by Koori-Torres Strait Islander playwright John

Class Analysis and Contemporary Australia Janeen Baxter, Michael Emmison and John Western (eds) Macmillan Australia, 1991 Reviewed by Jeremy Smith Australian studies of class have often been overshadowed by international efforts, notably those

When love doesn't conquer all Aya Written and directed by Solrun Hoaas Starring Eri Ishida, Nicholas Eadie, Chris Haywood, Christopher Parker and Jed Chedwiggen Kino Melbourne beginning October 18 Reviewed by Ulrike Erhardt This is a little

Great expectations, mixed results Great Expectations With Phillip Gould, Megan Williams, Vincent Ball, Zoe Bertram. Limited season at the Seymour Centre, Sydney Reviewed by Richard Ingram. I confess that musicals are a long way from my

By Susan Mackie SYDNEY — Carnivale kicks off with a free opening celebration, including an open air World Music Concert on October 6 at Campbell's Cove, which features international acts Lucky Dube — who some refer to as Africa's Peter Tosh

Walking On Sticks Written by Sara Cathcart and Andrea Lemon Performed by Sara Cathcart Anthill Theatre, South Melbourne Reviewed by Bronwen Beechey An Australian tourist arrives in Nicaragua to visit an old friend. Shortly after her arrival,

Success for long-awaited premieres By Catherine Gough-Brady ADELAIDE — The first Australian Composing Women Festival, held here September 20-22, heard works by Dulcie Holland, Miriam Hyde, Anne Carr-Boyd, Sarah Hopkins and many others. It

Death Dreams and Dancing in Nicaragua By Penny O'Donnell ABC Enterprises. 1991. 221 pp. $16.95 Reviewed by Pip Hinman Like thousands of other Westerners during the 1980s, Penny O'Donnell decided to see for herself what life in Sandinista

By Norm Dixon Genuine blues music comes from the heart. It originates from life experiences — sometimes the good ones, but more often the tough ones. Black Americans have always had it toughest in the United States, so it is little wonder that

Scratch! A scrapbook of radical cartooning in Australia No. 2 Winter/Spring 1991 Subscriptions $10 for two issues Reviewed by Tracy Sorensen Green Left readers will immediately recognise the work of many of the contributors to this lively

The Hired Man By Melvyn Bragg Music by Howard Goodall Directed by Marie Armstrong New Theatre, Sydney Reviewed by Deborah McCulloch Based on Melvyn Bragg's novel of the same name, The Hired Man is a tribute to his paternal grandfather, an

Sarraounia Produced, written and directed by Med Hondo With Aï Keïta as Sarraounia and Jean-Roger Milo as Captain Voulet From the novel by Abdoulaye Mamani AFI Cinema, Paddington (Sydney) on October 22, 8.30 p.m. and at the State Film

35 Up Directed by Michael Apted Valhalla, Sydney and Melbourne Reviewed by Ulrike Erhardt 35 Up is not a drink commercial but a human interest saga which started in 1963 when Michael Apted joined a program called Seven Up — an attempt to

The art of housework Her Story: Images of Domestic Labour in Art S.H. Ervin Gallery, Observatory Hill, Sydney, until October 21 Reviewed by Kim Spurway "Her Story" is a unique exhibition of images of domestic labour in Australian art. It

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