Cultural Dissent

By Susan Mackie SYDNEY — Tahir Hussan comes from the Darfour area of western Sudan. A rich cattle growing area on the banks of the Nile it is the home to the delicious cuisine served at his new cafe, Taste of the Nile, just off Oxford Street at

By Tracy Sorenson Poetry of a social activist In Times of Pestilence By Kevin Baker Five Islands Press. 64 pp. $9.95 Reviewed by Tracy Sorensen War, famine, ecological destruction: the global village is facing the abyss. Illawarra poet

Mindless entertainment for the boys in the reformatory school choir in Freedom is Paradise, another offering from the Soviet film festival.

the new clerks em = By Phil McManus having sworn their silent allegiance to maintain that which exists, there is a future of freeway parking lots at peak hour, a caffeine-fix at the office, cafeteria lunch, a drive to the suburbs and four

South African artists must consolidate the gains made through the liberation struggle by means of a Bill of Rights, according to African National Congress constitutional lawyer Albie Sachs. At the recent Grahamstown National Arts Festival, Sachs

By Norm Dixon The Fountain Directed by Yuri Mamin Screenplay by Vladimir Vardunis Produced by Lenfilms, USSR, 1988 With Asankul Kuttubayev, Sergi Dreiden, Zhana Karimtayeve and Victor Mikhailov Soon at the Academy Twin Cinema, Paddington,

By Steve Painter Humour-lock Gridlock By Ben Elton Macdonald. $29.95 (hb) Reviewed by Steve Painter At its best, Gridlock is a very funny novel about the ultimate traffic jam, which ties up London for three days, creating the political

By Tracy Sorenson Raspad Directed by Mikhail Belikov Showing at the second festival of new cinema from the Soviet Union At the Academy Twin and Walker cinemas, Sydney Until August 29 Reviewed by Tracy Sorensen "Raspad" translates as

Working people in paint SYDNEY — A unique exhibition of 35 painters who either identified with working people or depicted their living and working conditions is showing at the Campbelltown City Art Gallery until August 25. The exhibition

SYDNEY — Federal Labor MP Jeanette McHugh on August 17 launched a new edition of the popular resource booklet Uranium Mining in Australia. McHugh said the booklet, first published in 1984 by the Movement Against Uranium Mining (MAUM), is

By Ulrike Erhadt Defending Your Life Written and directed by Albert Brooks Starring Albert Brooks, Meryl Streep, Rip Torn, Lee Grant and Buck Henry Reviewed by Ulrike Erhadt Don't bother Defending Your Life because Judgment City , somewhere

By Phil Shannon Vietnam Days: Australia and the Impact of Vietnam Peter Pierce, Jeffrey Grey, Jeff Doyle (eds) Penguin, 1991. 323 pp. $19.95 Reviewed by Phil Shannon "The struggle of people [against power]", wrote the Czech author Milan

Viennese housing By Pete Malatesta SYDNEY — Brought to Australia by the Austrian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the City of Vienna, "New Housing in Vienna" is an exhibition of Viennese housing since the 1920s showing at the Tin Sheds Gallery,

The first issue of At Ease, a new alternative journal for men and women in the Australian military forces, appears this week. It is available from PO Box 167 North Carlton Vic 3054. The publishers aim to produce an eight-page magazine every two

Feminist Book Fortnight SYDNEY — The second Australian Feminist Book Fortnight will be taking place from September 6 to 22 and will present a national program of activities to celebrate women as writers and readers. An important part of the

By Phil McManus Everyone has heard of it, but who knows what it really means? Are the debates about postmodernism relevant only in the world of academia, or do they have an impact on the green, left, feminist and other movements for social change?

By Susannah Begg and Vannessa Hearman Black Rain Directed by Shohei Imamura Reviewed by Susannah Begg and Vannessa Hearman It was a hot, still day on August 6, 1945, when the A-bomb descended from the sky over Hiroshima. Imamura's masterful

By Catherine Gough-Brady A jam-packed festival of female composers' works will be performed September 20-22 in Adelaide. The Composing Women Festival has been instigated by composer activist Becky Llewellyn. Composition of art music is one of

By Tracy Sorenson Speaking with the sun New stories by Australian and New Zealand writers Edited by Stephanie Dowrick and Jane Parkin Allen and Unwin, 1991. 223 pp. $16.95 Reviewed by Tracy Sorensen The overarching presence of sky and sea

Story and photo by Peter Boyle When Brett Melke was a law student at Melbourne University, he worked part time as a hospital orderly. This is how he met Dr Eduardo Aranda, the brother of a Chilean union leader who was imprisoned under General

By Janet Fraser I spent Friday night glued to my television. Gone With the Wind? 9.5BIJ243>155BIJ0>/.5BI>255BI> Weeks? No, Handel's oratorio Messiah. Yes, even Handel has a video clip. At 175 minutes, it's arguably the world's longest, but a video

By Kim Spurway Visiting Hours Written by Felix Mitterer Directed by David Ritchie With Gertrude Ingeborg and Barry Jones Belvoir Theatre, Sydney, to September 15 Reviewed by Kim Spurway Visiting Hours is a funny and compassionate look at

by Stuart Wax Shopping for a Better World Council on Economic Priorities 350 pp. US$6.45 Reviewed By Stuart Wax When we buy a product at a supermarket, we not only purchase an item, but we also support the company that produced it. If you

CAA Aboriginal study tour SYDNEY — Community Aid Abroad here is to host a unique tour of discovery to explore the history and culture of Aboriginal communities in far western New South Wales. The two-week tour will include meetings with local

By Ulrike Erhardt Waiting Written and directed by Jackie McKimmie With Jackie McKimmie, Noni Hazelhurst, Deborra-Lee Furness, Frank Whitten, Helen Jones, Denis Moore, Fiona Press and Ray Barrett Reviewed by Ulrike Erhadt It's amazing what

Story and photo by Kim Shipton SYDNEY — Over two nights in August, a team of six graffiti artists created and dedicated a huge mural to the people of Newtown. The mural features planet earth, US civil rights campaigner Martin Luther King and a

Thelma and Louise Directed by Ridley Scott Screenplay by Callie Khouri With Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis Reviewed by Rose McCann The fact that a film like Thelma and Louise can excite such controversy and critical comment (including being

By Peter Boyle Bran Nue Dae A documentary film by Tom Zubrycki State Film Theatre, Melbourne Reviewed by Peter Boyle I wish I hadn't missed the stage musical performance of Bran Nue Dae in Sydney last year — especially after seeing

By Steven Giese Perspecta Art Gallery of NSW until September 15 Reviewed by Steven Giese This year's Perspecta was an understandably Greinerised affair, chopped back a bit (they couldn't afford the two dimensional artists), privatised to the

By Fiona Fort The Edinburgh Years Directed by Cameron P. Mellor Reviewed by Fiona Fort The Doug Anthony Allstars, middle-class Canberra boys and musical comedy group the world loves to hate, wreak havoc once more in their new feature-length

By Noel McGuire Patrick White — A life By David Marr Random House. 727 pp. $49.95 hardback Reviewed by Noel McGuire After he won the Nobel prize, Patrick White became a Living National Treasure. The fact that, to a large extent, his work

The seven day song cycle Two: Sheila em = By Tony Smith Sheila, eyes yellowed from grief, looked into mine, glassy with shame "I love you", she said "I love you, you know." Her uncle squatting propped against the tree beside her smiled his

By Leon Harrison Milestone for Aboriginal theatre Munjong By Richard Walley State Theatre Company The Hole in The Wall Theatre Subiaco, Perth Reviewed by Leon Harrison Like the Jimmy Chi musical Bran Nue Dae, Munjong is a milestone for

Funny work from feminists Melbourne can enjoy an exhibition by feminist cartoonists until September 22. The "Out of Line" exhibitors include Hermoine the Modern Girl's creator Kaz Cooke, and others. (Why not mention them all? Jane Carafella, Trudy

High tech lays Kevin low Because of a printer cartridge with a mind of its own, Kevin Healy was unable to send The Week That Was this week. The weekly Week That Was will return next week (technology permitting).

Phil Shannon The Gulf Between Us: The Gulf War And Beyond Edited by Victoria Brittain London: Virago. 1991. 186 pp., $17.95 (pb) Reviewed by Phil Shannon The English Guardian is the voice of liberal politics, that blend of "responsible"

By Norm Dixon It amazes and frustrates me how commercial radio play lists and record sales charts have for decades been dominated by legions of mediocre, cardboard cut-out "rock" bands and "superstars" while little credit and fewer rewards find

Trading in death and destruction "Australians Trading in Death and Destruction" is the slogan used by the Renegade Activists in their campaign against the military equipment exhibition AIDEX 91. This arms bazaar is to be held in Canberra in

A million miles from commerce A million miles from commerce By Monesque BRISBANE — From out of the bush, or probably more accurately, out from the alternative set of Brisbane and neighbouring regions from Maleny to Nimbin, come two

Medical services slammed By Bill Mason BRISBANE — The Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission has criticised medical services for Aboriginal communities in north Queensland as "inadequate and culturally inappropriate", in a report tabled

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