Australian News

By Janine Prince and Philippa Stanford BRISBANE — Women on campus here are fighting to maintain services and rights that are under attack. The women's rights area at the University of Queensland is threatened by a student executive that has

By Peter Boyle The days are now shorter in Kuwait. Sometimes in early afternoon the sun is blocked out by clouds of black smoke from the hundreds of burning oil wells. Kuwaiti Oil officials estimate that it might take up to four years to put out

Illawarra Steelers and State Rugby League player Rod Wishart and women's surf champion Jenny Gill were among the 190 participants in the inaugural Swim for Guatemala in Wollongong on February 23. Jointly oragnised by the Committee in Solidarity with

By Leon Harrison PERTH — The state government's plans for tourist development of Rottnest Island are meeting determined opposition from Aboriginal people are fighting to protect burial sites and to turn the old jail into a museum. From 1838

Carpenters union leadership in doubt By Michael Bull MELBOURNE — The leadership of the Victorian branch of the Association of Carpenters and Joiners has been changed twice in the last few weeks following revelations that large sums of money have

By Catherine Brown PERTH — "Equity, Equality and Participation" was the theme of the inaugural Trades and Labor Council annual conference. Held days, February 15-16, the conference was a new and welcome concept for a union movement lacking any

Secondary students denounce US war By Wendy Robertson and Tony Iltis MELBOURNE — About 100 people attended a rally outside the GPO called by Secondary Students Against the Gulf War on Friday, March 1, to highlight that, for the people of the

Protests slam Gulf 'allies' By Jim McIlroy BRISBANE — Popular opposition to the US-led war against Iraq was expressed in a rally and march here on Sunday, February 19, sponsored by the Gulf Action Coalition. Feature speaker at a rally in the

By Sally Low SYDNEY — From Friday July 12 to Sunday July 14 women from all round Australia will gather here to attend a National Lesbian Conference at the University of Technology. Clare Gallagher from the organising committee hopes that up to a

By Angela Matheson SYDNEY — Australia's first Aboriginal high school, Pemulwuy Koori College, was officially opened on February 27. The landmark occasion was celebrated by a crowd of over 500 people cheered and embraced as the Aboriginal flag

The Hawke government's promise of "resource security" for the forestry industry appears to be premised on massive subsidies by the taxpayer. SID WALKER explains what's at stake. Conservationists had good reason to be angered by the commitment to

MacDonnell park in doubt By Adriaan Anarco-Troika ALICE SPRINGS — A planned world-class national park in the West MacDonnell Ranges is now in doubt. Nan Smibert, coordinator of the Central Australian Conservation Council (CACC), said a 1989

Darwin development raises protests By Adriaan Anarco-Troika DARWIN — A controversial development of the city's shoreline has been given the go-ahead by the NT government. The proposed development at Cullen Bay, estimated to cost $120 million,

The Builders' Labourers Federation didn't go away after the Hawke government's drive to destroy it in the mid-'80s. It still has legally recognised branches in four states, and there are networks of former BLF members in the states where the union

By Andrew McGain ADELAIDE — Under cover of talk about making Australia's car industry internationally competitive and of the need for higher productivity and better quality, plans for a new round of attacks on car workers were announced last week.

By Harry Van Moorst Those of us who were dismayed at the outrageous media coverage of the Gulf War will be pleased to know that the military is about to provide us with a full rationale for media censorship during international conflicts. The

Environmental youthquake planned MELBOURNE — "Youthquake Australia" is the title of the second national conference of the Environmental Youth Alliance, scheduled for March 29 to April 1 at Wesley College. The EYA is a national organisation

SA child-care workers strike By Teresa Dowding ADELAIDE — Child-care workers from 90 centres in South Australia struck on March 11 over delays in wage talks. The 500 workers are members of the Miscellaneous Workers Union. SA child-care

HAMBURG — Filter dust containing dioxin is being exported from steelworks in Western Europe to Poland, Greenpeace has discovered. Under the misleading name "zinc concentrate", 31,000 tonnes of filter dusts from West European steelworks

By Peter Boyle With more than one in 10 people out of a job, unemployment in Australia has reached record levels, and Bob Hawke's March 12 economic statement promised do away with even more jobs. The official unemployment rate, as calculated by

By Michael Bell BRISBANE — Green Alliance lord mayoral candidate Drew Hutton believes Greens can expect to win one seat and as many as three in the March 23 Brisbane City Council elections. With the Liberal-dominated council of Sallyanne

By Anna McCormack BRISBANE — For 19 years, unpaid volunteers of the Children By Choice organisation have operated a counselling service offering advice on all options available to women faced with unwanted or unplanned pregnancy. Now the group is

By Harry Van Moorst MELBOURNE — Unemployment groups have begun organising for a major Unemployment Summit conference, to be held here in April. The Coalition Against Poverty and Unemployment and the Victorian Unemployed Workers Union have held

Greens won't direct preferences By Michael Bell BRISBANE — The Green Alliance has decided not to direct preferences in the March 23 Brisbane City Council elections. "Our dilemma is that the Liberals won't give too many promises on the

South Sydney Greens set preselection By Peter Boyle SYDNEY — The South Sydney Greens have organised two public meetings to preselect candidates for the seats of Marrickville and Heffron in the coming state elections. The Marrickville meeting is

Green Left schedule Green Left is taking a one-week Easter holiday. The next issue will be dated April 10.

By Michael Bell BRISBANE — Green Alliance candidates polled up to 26% in local government elections here on March 23. While the Greens didn't win any seats, their preferences are expected to decide several. In a surprise win for the Labor Party,

By Garry Walters MELBOURNE — Rail unionists are concerned that plans for reorganisation of Australia's railways could open the door to privatisation of the main inter-city routes while the remnants of the old state networks are left to fall into

Black deaths commission slams cops By Leon Harrison PERTH — Kalgoorlie police have been slammed by the Royal Commission Into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody over their treatment of three Aboriginal prisoners who died in the Kalgoorlie lockup.

Duck rescuers out in big numbers By Mark Berriman Animal rights and environmental groups launched some of the largest operations yet to retrieve dead and injured waterfowl as the 1991 duck season opened on March 16. In NSW about 200 rescuers

By Jon Singer PERTH — The first weeks of the WA Inc royal commission have shed some light on the operations of the Peppermint Grove set and how a good number of the financial and political "geniuses" of the '80s became the bankrupt (though by no

'Arabs to pay' for Gulf War By Jim McIlroy BRISBANE — The Arab world, in particular the ordinary people of the Middle East, will pay much of the enormous cost of the US-led war against Iraq, Dr Robert Springborg told an audience of 120 here on

The slaughter of Bool Lagoon By Pamela Irving -1>ADELAIDE — At 6.45 a.m. on March 2, the sky over Bool Lagoon in South Australia's south-east echoed to the boom of guns and the cries of water birds taking flight as 550 camouflage-clad,

By Angela Matheson Photo by David Brazil SYDNEY — The Rainbow Warrior concluded its month-long tour of Australia with a week's visit at Darling Harbour, where more than 3000 people were shown over the ship by Greenpeace members. The Warrior

By Steve Painter Arthur Scargill, the British mineworkers leader who was unofficial public enemy number one for much of the reign of Margaret Thatcher, has politically outlived the prime minister who threw enormous resources into a number of

By Dick Nichols SYDNEY — After three weeks of indecision, the Australian Democrats' two members of the New South Wales Legislative Council voted on March 21 to support Greiner government legislation for a referendum that would reduce the chamber

By Adriaan Anarco-Troika DARWIN — The chief political reporter for the Murdoch-owned Northern TerritoryNews, Frank Alcorta, is being criticised for accepting a $20,000 commission from the CLP government to write a book. The "coffee table" book is

By Steve Painter As many as 5000 jobs may be under threat at Qantas as a result of mismanagement of the national airline over the past decade. The latest figure, which amounts to almost a third of the company's 17,000-strong workforce, is the

By John Hallam In what has almost become an annual ritual blood-letting, the ALP is yet again preparing to tear up the "three mine policy". Everyone agrees that the "three mine policy" is not entirely rational. It can't be, because it is a

Unemployed plan protests By Andrew Bath MELBOURNE — Unemployment and welfare groups here are preparing a campaign to highlight Labor government attacks on the unemployed and to promote a genuine program of job creation. The groups are

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