Analysis

Other than those held in detention, refugees and asylum seekers living in communities across Australia are probably the most vulnerable to COVID-19, writes Jonathan Strauss.

The coronavirus pandemic is both a threat to our health and corporate profits. As Alex Bainbridge argues, our health needs must come first, which means meeting health needs without making workers and the unemployed pay for the crisis.

After explicitly ruling them out, the federal government has now announced it will legislate for wage subsidy packages. Lisbeth Latham takes a critical look at what's on offer.

Who should pay for the more than $300 billion COVID-19 stimulus packages? Rather than shifting the cost on to workers and the poor, Jim McIlroy points to an alternative solution.

Life under COVID-19 just got scarier for many women. Isolation at home is not the safest choice for women trapped in abusive relationships, writes Chloe DS.

The COVID-19 crisis is highlighting how inadequate the rules governing casual workers really are, writes Leo Crnogorčević.

The federal government is not taking the necessary measures to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission to inmates and staff at its immigration detention facilities, argues Niko Leka.

Governments are opting for authoritarian measures they claim will protect us in the pandemic. Jacob Andrewartha argues their main focus should be educational and service-focused.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has closed down federal parliament, ostensibly for health reasons, and placed corporate CEOs at the helm of his new National COVID-19 Coordination Commission. Paul Gregoire takes aim at this blatant power grab.

The federal government has passed two stimulus packages, largely aimed at helping its corporate mates. Unions need to push hard for income protection and welfare support, argues Tim Gooden.

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