Analysis

People cherish their privacy and prefer explicit requests for consent as to how, when and by whom their data are used or shared, writes Ernst Merkenich.

The Prime Minister's pitiful one word change to the national anthem is a meaningless symbolic change that aims to bolster nationalism, argue Marianne Mackay and Alex Bainbridge.

When Indian cricketers reported racist abuse during the recent Sydney test match, Australia’s ugly racism hit the headlines again. Sue Bull argues the media has an interest in muddying the connection between capitalism and racism.

Suzanne James writes that until systemic racial profiling ends, Black deaths in custody will continue and the 1991 royal commission's recommendations will not be implemented.

More and more, people own less and less when it comes to digital technology. Aleks Wansbrough looks at how the privatisation of communication technologies has serious social consequences.

As the Capitol Hill 'invasion' goes sour and Australian MPs rush to get their stories straight, let's not sweep the ugly truth about US 'democracy’ under the carpet, writes Pip Hinman.

A People’s Inquiry to examine the United States-Australia alliance — its costs and consequences — and to canvas alternatives has been launched, writes Bevan Ramsden.

That Julian Assange cannot be extradited is welcome, but the ruling comes after the charade in which British authorities held him in a top security prison and made his defence as difficult as possible, argues Stuart Rees.

The pandemic has thrown up many challenges for employers and employees, backpackers and farmers, writes Chris McCoomb.

The Socialist Alliance condemns new federal anti-worker bills.

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