Analysis

First Nations people have historically been excluded from Australian universities. Even so-called “sandstone universities” were built on a foundation of invasion, genocide and land theft, writes Markela Panegyres.

The war in Ukraine has made an already critical food crisis worse. Fingers point to grain supply shortages, but the problem is far deeper and linked to the economic system that turns food into a profitable commodity, writes William Briggs.

The Barangaroo project and casino is a story of corruption and secrecy, motivated by profit, and widespread opposition from community groups. Ben Radford reports.

The energy crisis we didn’t need to have has put the question of a publicly-owned energy industry on the table again. Sue Bull argues that is the only way to keep good jobs and energy prices down. 

At the recent Bonn climate talks, the rulers of rich nations act like arsonists who, after lighting the fire, prevent anyone calling the fire brigade, writes Alex Bainbridge.

A significant number of members are leaving the Australian Education Union because it failed to wage a strong campaign for workload relief and fair salaries, argues Mary Merkenich.

Anti-poverty campaigners are calling on Anthony Albanese’s Labor government to scrap the controversial new Workforce Australia program, reports Isaac Nellist.

While Qantas services sank and 9000 lost their jobs, chief executive Alan Joyce engineered the biggest transfer of public money to a corporation in Australia’s history, reports Michael West.

Nearly one in 25 young people have a problem with gambling, and teenagers are four times more likely to develop gambling problems than adults. Darren Saffin reports.

The only shock about the British Home Secretary’s decision to extradite Julian Assange to the US was that it did not come sooner, writes Binoy Kampmark.

The suspension of the national electricity market points to the need to learn from the past. The whole idea of having an energy market for a commodity that everyone needs is a scam, argues Pip Hinman.

The Albanese government's plan to push ahead with the purchase of nuclear submarines as part of the AUKUS deal is an extraordinary waste, writes Peter Boyle.

A new judicial inquiry into gay and transgender hate crimes from 1970 to 2010 will look into the indifference of the NSW Police. Rachel Evans reports.

Indian-Australians and anti-racist supporters are continuing to organise against the Hindutva hate movement being promoted in Australia. Rachel Evans reports.

Confusingly, Labor's Defence Minister Richard Marles told the Shangri-la Dialogue that Australia needs a good relationship with China while also letting it be known he supports the United States' anti-China campaign. William Briggs reports.

The federal government will spend $48.6 billion on the military. This, we are told, is to keep us safe. But, as William Briggs argues, many are feeling decidedly unsafe. Our fear is real as we wonder how to keep warm, pay the bills and keep a roof over our heads?

Pages

Subscribe to Analysis