Analysis

Independent journalism has never been more important to democracy. Thankfully, Walkley Award-winning journalist Michael West is surprisingly optimistic about the future of independent media.

In this episode of Green Left, Amin Afravi, Sue Bolton and Chris Breen look at the reasons for the government decision to release refugees and the next steps in the campaign.

As more of our lives are mediated through the internet, private companies cannot be allowed to dictate the terms on which we relate to each other, argue Tim Scriven and Aleks Wansbrough.

This year marks 30 years of Green Left. Its longevity comes down to it being a people-powered project. With its expanding multimedia platforms, there's room for you too, writes Peter Boyle.

Marianne Mackay and Sam Wainwright argue that the forced clearing of the Fremantle homeless people’s camp demonstrates the WA Labor government's failure to address homelessness.

The Socialist Alliance argues that Australia is the aggressors in the growing trade war with China.

Green Left has launched a new show, with its first episode focused on Invasion Day. It features First Nations activists Lidia Thorpe, Marianne Mackay and Elizabeth Jarrett.

Federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg is very upbeat about the economy, despite an official unemployment rate of 6.6% and a growing wealth divide. Peter Boyle investigates.

The climate-denying federal government is putting Australia on track to reach net zero emissions in 300 years, writes Sarah Hathway.

To mark its 30th birthday, Green Left editors Pip Hinman and Susan Price discuss this unique people-powered media project, it origins, the development of its ecosocialist vision and the paper’s role in building grassroots movements.

Alexander Brown, Melanie Barnes and Nick Southall write about John Rainford's contributions to communist, labour and social movements.

People cherish their privacy and prefer explicit requests for consent as to how, when and by whom their data is used or shared, writes Ernst Merkenich.

The Prime Minister's pitiful one word change to the national anthem is a meaningless symbolic change that aims to bolster nationalism, argue Marianne Mackay and Alex Bainbridge.

When Indian cricketers reported racist abuse during the recent Sydney test match, Australia’s ugly racism hit the headlines again. Sue Bull argues the media has an interest in muddying the connection between capitalism and racism.

Suzanne James writes that until systemic racial profiling ends, Black deaths in custody will continue and the 1991 royal commission's recommendations will not be implemented.

More and more, people own less and less when it comes to digital technology. Aleks Wansbrough looks at how the privatisation of communication technologies has serious social consequences.

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