Analysis

By calling Armistice Day on November 11 “Remembrance Day” we miss the point. The original Armistice Day in 1918 was a day of joy, celebrating the end of a hugely bloody war. As one newspaper at the time described it: “Whole country goes wild with joy at news of peace”.  

One of the usual threats trotted out by governments proposing what would otherwise be considered radical attacks on civil liberties is national security, writes Pauline Wright.

A year on from the result of Australia’s marriage equality postal survey, Rachel Evans takes a look at the grassroots campaign that made this historic victory possible, and some of the remaining challenges ahead for the LGBTI community.

It seems ridiculous that children have got to the point where they realise that the adults who are supposed to be in charge are not doing enough to protect our futures from dangerous climate change. So, together with kids from Kindergarten to Year 12 we have decided to strike from school to show them that this simply isn’t good enough.

Strong support for climate action is adding to the nationwide pressure on proponents of the controversial Adani coalmine in central Queensland.

The Big Money Club clearly lives by its own perverse rules.

In the wake of the Wentworth byelection and the debate about its meaning a lot of commentary has focused on the desire for a return to the “sensible centre”.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s announcement that all refugee children will be removed from Nauru by the end of the year demonstrates that the refugee rights movement is winning, writes Susan Price.

Back in the 1990s, we were told the privatisation of electricity and other basic services would mean consumers get a better deal. Today, we know that was a lie.

Australia has not had a socialist parliamentarian, at the state or federal level, since the 1940s. But this may change at the November 24 Victorian state election, writes Felix Dance.

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