1267

The world premiere of a 14-year struggle for jobs will be screened at this year's “virtual” Sydney Film Festival. Women of Steel, a finalist for an award, documents a hard-won campaign by women in the Illawarra to force BHP to hire them, write Pip Hinman and Peter Boyle.

The JobMaker plan is an attempt to get us to accept a return to the neoliberal regime that made jobs precarious, ran down public services and made housing and education unaffordable, writes Peter Boyle.

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro persists in his attitude of denial, characterising the coronavirus as a “little flu”: a definition that deserves to be included in the annals, not of medicine, but of political madness, writes Michael Lowy. But this madness has its logic, which is the logic of neofascism.

A tweet by Victoria’s deputy Chief Health Officer Dr Annaliese van Diemen on the 250th anniversary of Captain Cook’s arrival in Australia, which provoked a furious response from right-wing culture warriors, has led to a greater awareness of the legacy of colonialism, writes Chloe DS

The federal government is demanding (un)employment agencies get proactive and schedule appointments with unemployed workers — despite mutual obligations being suspended until June 1, writes Kerry Smith.

Given the composition of the National COVID-19 Co-ordinating Commission, it is little wonder its pandemic “recovery” plan is based on public handouts to the corporate gas sector, write Margaret Gleeson and Pip Hinman.

The federal government is pursuing criminal prosecutions against a former secret agent and his lawyer for allegedly revealing Australia had bugged East Timor cabinet meetings during negotiations over the Timor Sea boundary. Paul Oboohov spoke to Timor Sea Justice Forum's Susan Connelly about the case.

Rights groups have slammed a last-minute decision by the Indonesian authorities to deny parole to five Papuan activists jailed on charges of treason over a peaceful protest in August last year, writes James Balowski.

Israel and the Gulf states are pushing towards a normalisation of ties, entrenching cooperative measures that go back decades. By solidifying relations with the Gulf monarchies, writes Rupen Savoulian, Tel Aviv aims to isolate the Palestinians, score diplomatic and economic victories, and formalise an anti-Iranian alliance.

As university staff begin to emerge from the COVID-19 lockdown, many — perhaps most — are perplexed at the perverse behaviour of the National Tertiary Education Union, write two members Tim Battin and Kelvin McQueen.

Women are bearing the brunt of the COVID-19 economic pain, in what some have dubbed the 'pink collar' recession, writes Pip Hinman.

Calls are growing for early childhood education to move away from the for-profit model, writes Jim McIlroy.

Black men and women are murdered by cops and white thugs, and nothing happens. The criminal “justice” system legally backs the crimes of cops and racists as “justifiable”. It happens so often that African Americans initially just shrug and hold back outrage, writes Malik Miah. Then anger explodes when the truth is revealed.

Hundreds of people from across Australia connected via Zoom on May 19 to tell Marsh insurance brokers not to help Adani find insurance for its controversial coal mine, reports Coral Wynter.

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