Peter Boyle

Veteran South Africa anti-Apartheid activist Sidney Luckett spoke to Green Left's Peter Boyle about the important link between South Africa's iconic freedom fighter Nelson Mandela and Kurdish leader Abdullah Ocalan.

Peter Dutton pretends not to know his right from his left. But, as Peter Boyle argues, facts have never been his strong point.

Less than two years after being elected, a split-off from the Alliance of Hope has reached out to corrupt former MPs to try to form a new government in a move widely denounced as a “backdoor coup”, writes Peter Boyle.

Thousands of Kurds and their international supporters converged for a huge protest in Strasbourg, France, to demand the release of Kurdish leader Abdullah Ocalan, writes Peter Boyle.

Three feeder columns of the annual Long March to free Kurdish leader Abdullah Ocalan, which started in Geneva, Frankfurt and Luxembourg, are converging on Strasbourg, France, reports Peter Boyle.

Peter Boyle reports from Brussels that European left and green parliamentarians condemned Turkey's invasion of Rojava, the democratic autonomous liberated zone in North and East Syria, at an international conference on February 5–6.

Banks are hated for good reasons: they rip off and abuse ordinary customers while helping their richest clients spirit away ill-gotten gains. They help keep the poor poor while making the rich even richer, writes Peter Boyle.

While the stark reality of the global climate emergency struck home in Australia with its worst bushfire season, its neighbour Indonesia faced catastrophic floods and islands disappearing below the rising sea. Green Left's Peter Boyle interviewed Friends of the Earth Indonesia climate change campaigner Yuyun Harmono about the situation.

A selectively edited and captioned video clip of a recent West Papua solidarity protest outside the Indonesian consulate in Sydney has been circulating on Twitter. It purports to show that the protesters were paid $50 each to attend the protest and agreed to burn the West Papuan Morning Star flag for $100, but only off camera.

When British essayist Samuel Johnson wrote in 1774 the famous words “Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel” the context was an aggressive British colonial expansionist push and associated wars with its European colonial competitors.

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