Jonathan Strauss

Jonathan Strauss argues that organisation and unity will assist the struggle to create a different life to corporate Australia’s version of the “new normal”.

Many are doubtful that the National Tertiary Education Union national executive's jobs protection plan sets out to do what it claims to, writes Jonathan Strauss.

Jonathan Strauss writes that many university workers are questioning the National Tertiary Education Union's leadership during the COVID-19 crisis, sparking a debate among members about the union's strategy to protect workers' conditions.

Other than those held in detention, refugees and asylum seekers living in communities across Australia are probably the most vulnerable to COVID-19, writes Jonathan Strauss.

An Extinction Rebellion protest in Melbourne in October.

In response to the climate emergency and growing social inequality, socialist parties and campaigns in Europe and North America have proposed socially transformative green new deals. But what could one for Australia look like?

A placard at a refugee rights rally in Sydney on July 21.

The government's treatment of refugees reads like something out of George Orwell’s seminal work, 1984. Fortunately, 1984 is fiction and we can force them to change.

Politics in Britain is in turmoil. An early election will most likely happen as soon as December, or at the latest within a few months — the second early election since 2017.

This election will pit the Jeremy Corbyn-led Labour Party against various parties representing the interests of the 1%, including the governing Conservative party (Tories), the Liberal Democrats and the recently-formed, far right, Brexit Party.

Jonathan Strauss joined the September 1 vigil in Cairns for the Biloela family of Priya, Nades and their two children and writes about the growing impact of the refugee rights mvement.

Mainstream talk of Queenslanders embracing the Coalition at the federal elections is louder than ever but the facts are otherwise, writes Jonathan Strauss.

Populism Now! The Case for Progressive Populism
David McKnight
New South, 2018
177 pages, rrp $29.99

David McKnight’s Populism Now! catches a wave of discussion about the chances for a progressive “populism”, writes Jonathan Strauss.

Also in the spray, for example, is a June Quarterly Essay piece by the Australia Institute’s Richard Denniss “Dead Right: how neoliberalism ate itself and what comes next” and the previously post-whatever Chantal Mouffe’s musings on “left populism”.

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