Spain

The Spanish state's relentless pursuit of Catalan independence activists suffered a big hit when the National High Court found the former Catalan police chief and his three fellow defendants not guilty on all charges, reports Dick Nichols.

With Spain in lock down, Federico Fuentes spoke to Green Left European correspondent Dick Nichols, who is based in Barcelona, about the grim reality on the ground and how, among the sorrow, examples of people’s solidarity are shining through.

Whenever supporters of Catalan sovereignty and independence have been asked to travel far from home to champion their country’s democratic rights, they have always rallied to the cause, writes Dick Nichols from Barcelona.

By the narrowest of margins (167 votes to 165 with 18 abstentions), the 350-seat Spanish Congress invested a coalition government of the social-democratic Spanish Socialist Workers Party (PSOE) and the more radical Unidas Podemos (UP) on January 7.

No Spanish prime minister has ever been elected by so low and so close a vote: eight of the parliament’s eighteen parties voted in favour, eight against and two abstained.

On November 12, largely in reaction to the rise of the right-wing Vox, Socialist Workers' Party leader Pedro Sánchez and Unidas Podemos' Pablo Iglesias stitched up a pre-agreement for government in less than 48 hours, writes Dick Nichols.

Spain’s acting Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez, leader of the Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party (PSOE) and winner of the April 28 general election, informed King Philip on September 17 that he lacked the support to form a government. As a result, another general election will be held on November 10.

Following weeks of negotiations, Italy’s 5 Star Movement (M5S) and the Democratic Party (PD) have agreed to form a new coalition government, which will put Matteo Salvini’s far-right Lega (League) into a corner — at least for now, writes Daniele Fulvi.

In the May 26 European elections, Spanish social democratic party PSOE made gains, largely at the expense of the left wing Podemos. The PSOE delegation is now the largest S&D presence in the European parliament and will be the backbone of ongoing attempts to break the back of the Catalan sovereignty movement, writes Dick Nichols.

The PSOE’s election campaign against Spain's radical local councils portrays them as “amateurs” and “day-dreamers” who “waste precious public resources on failed experiments”, writes Dick Nichols.

The electoral defeat of the right in Spain on April 28 is a cause for celebration for all progressive people, writes Dick Nichols.

Pages

Subscribe to Spain